surveillance

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surveillance

close observation or supervision maintained over a person, group, etc., esp one in custody or under suspicion

surveillance

the monitoring, and the associated direct or indirect forms of supervision and superintendence by the modern STATE, of the activities of its citizens. The capacity for surveillance possessed by modern NATION STATES has increased compared with those available to earlier forms of state, as the result of spectacular improvements in techniques for the collection and storage of INFORMATION and equally striking improvements in means of transport and communications.

For FOUCAULT, in Discipline and Punish (1975), the ‘disciplinary power’ of modern societies is an all-pervasive feature of these societies and a predominant feature of administrative power within them. Remedial and CARCERAL ORGANIZATIONS, which remove human liberty are not more than extreme forms of a generalized tendency to heightened surveillance within these societies.

Foucault's emphasis is disputed by many however. Our heightened awareness of, and concern about, situations in which some individuals are subject to loss of liberty reflects the new importance of a concern for liberty within modern societies and the many areas of life in which liberties have increased. Nonetheless, few dispute that – for good and for ill – surveillance and control are an important characteristic of modern societies and the modern state. Compare ORIENTAL DESPOTISM, ABSOLUTISM. See also SEQUESTRATION, TOTALITARIANISM.

surveillance

[sər′vā·ləns]
(engineering)
Systematic observation of air, surface, or subsurface areas or volumes by visual, electronic, photographic, or other means, for intelligence or other purposes.

surveillance

The systematic observation of airspace, surface or subsurface areas, places, persons, or things, by visual, aural, electronic, photographic, or other means.
References in periodicals archive ?
It also seeks to initially win a consensus of the ten participating countries on the preparation of annual reports on epidemiological surveillance.
In the case of the Health Surveillance Policy, there are various interests in dispute and it may become clearer to managers of what health surveillance we are talking about: the one that is closer to a concept of Public Health Surveillance or Epidemiological Surveillance, as defined in Ordinance No 1,378", or a broader concept that encompasses all the surveillance activities in the same field?
The website for the Zoonosis Division of the Epidemiological Surveillance Center of the Disease Control Office, Sao Paulo State Secretary of Health (ZD/ESC/ DCO/SPSSH) was accessed for the same period (10).
Unquestionably, the history of epidemiological surveillance in Poland is closely related to the creation and activity of the National Institute of Hygiene [12].
In turn, the Pan American Health Organization and World Health Organization in September called on nations that are home to the disease-transmitting mosquitoes--known as Aedes aegypti mosquitoes--to strengthen and step up efforts in six areas: patient care, social communication, epidemiological surveillance, laboratory-based diagnostic capacity, integrated mosquito control and environmental health.
The next day, an epidemiological surveillance team in Guinea alerted Senegalese authorities that they had lost track of a person who had had contact with sick people.
On September 2 and 6, 2013, Mexico's National System of Epidemiological Surveillance identified two cases of cholera in Mexico City.
The ministry drew up an epidemiological surveillance contingency plan and sent circulars to all clinics and public and private hospitals on diagnosing the disease, quarantining positive cases and collecting samples for lab tests.
Once we were informed about the reported case, we examined the patient and found out that it was a new kind of virus," said Abdulhakeem Al-Kuhlani, director of the Epidemiological Surveillance and Disease Control Department at the Health Ministry.
Accordingly, the collaborative federalism approach is used in this article to examine the public health policies and epidemiological surveillance and intervention functions of two nations: the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, and the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela.

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