epigenetics

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Related to Epigenetic inheritance: Epigenetics

epigenetics

[¦ep·ə·jə¦ned·iks]
(genetics)
The study of those processes by which genetic information ultimately results in distinctive physical and behavioral characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
conveys epigenetic inheritance during mitosis and meiosis; Cell 93:505;
The purpose of this article is to explain the basic science of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, highlighting particularly intriguing examples from human beings and rodent models, and to suggest that these discoveries require appropriate responses from Christian educators in science and from Christian communities in general.
New findings indicate that the role of genes and our understanding of inheritance are all the more complex, with RNA playing a greater role than expected, sections of DNA coding for more than one protein, overlapping genes, single genes being located on multiple chromosomes, and epigenetic inheritance (Pearson, 2006; Pennisi, 2007; Flannery, 2010).
Azim Surani, who was not involved in this study, said "This elegant study on TRIM28 provides significant mechanisticinsights on how maternal factors in eggs ensure faithful epigenetic inheritance that plays a critical role during development.
The case for transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in humans.
This structured reference intended for a wide audience of students and researchers introduces epigenetics and epigenetic methods in 16 contributed chapters covering such topics as early life environment, murine models of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, centromeres and telomeres, histones (dosage and degradation), DNA methylation changes in cancer, and variant histones H2A and cancer development, among other topics.
These new biological arguments provide a modern context suggesting that Kammerer could be the actual discoverer of epigenetic inheritance.
The remaining 23 invited papers explore the human, mosquito, and viral factors that contribute to the global spread and persistence of dengue; the possible roles of interlinked bistable networks, epigenetic inheritance, and bet-hedging in bacteria; and the identification and localization of base J in the genome of kinetoplastids, the enzymes involved in J biosynthesis, and possible biological functions.
Today, the evidence for epigenetic inheritance in plants and animals--from paramecia and yeast to humans and corn--is abundant (Jablonka and Lamb 1995).
The final class of arguments offered by Jablonka and Lamb is perhaps the most interesting, dealing as it does with interactions between the genetic (DNA) and epigenetic inheritance systems.