epigenetics

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epigenetics

[¦ep·ə·jə¦ned·iks]
(genetics)
The study of those processes by which genetic information ultimately results in distinctive physical and behavioral characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seed focuses specifically on DNA methylation on the epigenome by examining differences in methylation between known fertile sperm DNA and infertile sperm DNA.
Time of perturbation differentially affects the epigenome and many changes are brain region-specific.
When stem cells don't receive enough vitamin C, the epigenome can become damaged in a way that increases stem cell function but also increases the risk of leukemia.
In the study, the researchers found small levels of molecules that were communicating with cells of the mice through the epigenome.
Genome DNA--the complete Genes for building set of instructions for proteins and other building an organism molecules Transcriptome RNA--copies of Reflects which genes are protein-building turned on and off and instructions their activity level Proteome Proteins How the genetic instruction manual is actually being applied Metabolome Small molecules Chemical reactions (metabolites) happening inside an organism Epigenome Molecules that modify How environmental the genome to change factors are influencing when genes are turned the activity of genes on and off Phenome Outcomes determined Traits and diseases by the other layers
NIH-supported researchers map epigenome of more than 100 tissue and cell types.
A decade of exploring the cancer epigenome --biological and translational implications.
The study identified mutations in the sperm epigenome of great-grandchild male rats.
An organism's epigenome refers to a chemical apparatus that sits atop the DNA and regulates if and when genes get expressed.
1] Derived from the Greek, epigenome means "above" the genome.
The genome is the sequence of 3 billion molecules that constitute all of a person's DNA while the epigenome is which bits of DNA are turned on or off even as the molecular sequence remains unchanged.
In other words, when preeclampsia or HELLP with permanent changes in the nature and number of epigenomic marks (mostly 5-methylcytosine) resets the maternal and/or fetal epigenome, the changed epigenetic memory will lead to persistent changes in the transcription of specific genes (given the location of the epigenomic marks in regulatory regions, such as CpG islands) and thereby lead to an increased CVD risk for both the mother and child.