Epirote State

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Epirote State

 

(until the 1960’s, referred to in historiography as the Despotate of Epirus), a state in the western part of the Balkan Peninsula. The Epirote state was established in 1204, after the overthrow of the Byzantine Empire by the Crusaders. Its founder was Michael Angelus Ducas (ruled 1204–15). The state, which had its capital at Arta, was inhabited by Greeks, Slavs, Albanians, Vlachs, and other peoples. The vicegerents of the administrative regions were usually relatives of the head of state and were practically independent of the central authorities. Theodore Angelus, who ruled 1215–30, wrested Thessaloniki from the Roman Empire in 1224; he declared himself emperor and made Thessaloniki his capital. After Theodore Angelus’ forces were routed by the Bulgars at Klotkotnica in 1230, the Epirote state declined. In 1252 the state temporarily became a vassal of the Nicaean Empire, and in 1337 it was annexed to the Byzantine Empire, which had been reestablished in 1261, and ceased to exist as a state. Until 1340 attempts were made to restore it as an independent state.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.