episcopalian

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Related to Episcopalianism: Episcopal Church

episcopalian

1. practising or advocating the principle of Church government by bishops
2. an advocate of such Church government

Episcopalian

1. belonging to or denoting the Episcopal Church
2. a member or adherent of this Church
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Episcopalian
http://www.holycross.net/anonline.htm
http://www.episcopalian.org/
References in periodicals archive ?
Episcopalianism may long for the centralized authority of a Roman Catholic pope and Vatican departments to firmly settle questions about ordaining homosexuals or women to the priesthood.
The period in which this development took place was one in which throughout Massachusetts merchants, lawyers, manufacturers, and other representatives of the "Center" were being drawn away from Congregationalism to Episcopalianism and Unitarianism.
Sigmund had already made the great jump from fundamentalist Protestantism to Episcopalianism.
While he rejects the Episcopalianism of his childhood, Wright often renegotiates the vocabulary and rituals of the Christian tradition alongside those of Eastern philosophy in an attempt to locate sacredness as a function of place and memory (Jarman 159-61; Costello 329).
Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1997), and those of the Scottish Episcopal Church, most notably Episcopalianism in Nineteenth-Century Scotland by Rowan Strong (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002) and The Scottish Episcopal Church by Gavin White (available at www.
Influenced by the Social Gospel of upper-class American Episcopalianism, he added his voice in 1900 to the campaign against urban vice, and, in a sermon entitled "Redemption of a Godless City," called for the establishment of a government agency that would serve as a "Department of Public Morals," whose board would study the social conditions of New York and formulate ways to bring about "elevation of the people socially and morally.
It is clear that the former include at least the Orthodox churches and probably the denominations, such as Episcopalianism, that maintain apostolic succession and the Eucharist.
7] Unlike Foxe, she presents apocalypse as that which illuminates not the history of England as one of the sites of the persecuted Church of Christ, not the oppression of the true Church by the stubborn and powerful remnants of episcopalianism and not the promise of the Church's final victory over the Antichrist, but the personal histories of her dedicatees: Mary Sidney's career as writer and translator; Catherine Willoughby and her daughter Susan Bertie's involvement in the Reformation; and Margaret Clifford, Countess of Cumberland and her daughter Anne's personal, political, and legal battle for control of their family estates.
For many years he clung to the form and practice of Episcopalianism, but he always considered himself a "seeker" after religious certitude, a certitude he never felt he possessed in this life.
The take-charge "attitude" that John claims is characteristic of Episcopalianism certainly characterizes Didion's personality throughout the book, as she struggles to maintain a sense of control, both in her interactions with the doctors who treat Quintana's illness and, more irrationally, in her response to John's death.
Monoconfessional Anglican minicommunions Anglican Communion Network (ACN) 1,000,000 Ec Global Anglican Futures Conference (GAFCON) 50,000,000 Cc International Communion of the Charismatic Episcopal Church (ICCEC) 950,000 Ea Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC) 400,000 Eb 16 other schismatic communions ex Anglicanism/ Episcopalianism, including: Anglican Church International Communion, Anglican Orthodox Communion (AOC), Communion of the Evangelical Episcopal Church (CEEC), Reformed Episcopal Church (REC), et aha 7,600,000 Ec 5.
Polk's effort "to adapt Episcopalianism to the evangelical culture of the mid-nineteenth century South" (219) was his seminal contribution because he helped make the denomination relevant beyond its elite but numerically small laity.