episode

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episode

1. an incident, sequence, or scene that forms part of a narrative but may be a digression from the main story
2. (in ancient Greek tragedy) a section between two choric songs
3. Music a contrasting section between statements of the subject, as in a fugue or rondo

episode

any ‘historically located sequence of change’ (e.g. the origins of PRISTINE STATES) with ‘a specific opening, trend of events and outcome’, but not a part of any necessary sequence of social development (GIDDENS, 1981). see also EPISODIC CHARACTERIZATION.

episode

[′ep·ə‚sōd]
(geology)
A distinctive event or series of events in the geologic history of a region or feature.
References in classic literature ?
Regarding the episode of "Pavlicheff's son," Gania had been absolutely silent, partly from a kind of false modesty, partly, perhaps, to "spare the prince's feelings.
When the forenoon was nearly gone, she recognized with a pang that this most splendid episode of her life was almost over, that nothing could prolong it, that nothing quite its equal could ever fall to her fortune again.
He narrated that episode so persistently and with so important an air that everyone believed in the merit and usefulness of his deed, and he had obtained two decorations for Austerlitz.
The episode meant more to him than being bested in play by the best swordsman in England--for that surely was no disgrace--to Henry it seemed prophetic of the outcome of a future struggle when he should stand face to face with the real De Montfort; and then, seeing in De Vac only the creature of his imagination with which he had vested the likeness of his powerful brother-in-law, Henry did what he should like to have done to the real Leicester.
The momentary depression occasioned by the dramatic little episode of a few minutes ago, seemed already to have passed from the girl's manner.
The episode with Makovkina had occurred after five years of his hermit life.
Tudor had always been a wanderer, and with facile wit and quick vivid description he leaped from episode and place to episode and place, relating his experiences seemingly not because they were his, but for the sake of their bizarreness and uniqueness, for the unusual incident or the laughable situation.
Woodford concluded his account of the episode with a statement to the effect: "What especially struck me was the absence of pain and terror in their faces, which seemed to express, rather, serenity and repose"--this, mind you, of men and women of his own race whom he knew well and who had sat at dinner with him in his own house.
So the Wilcox episode fell into the background, leaving behind it memories of sweetness and horror that mingled, and the sisters pursued the life that Helen had commended.
The sisters were alike as little girls, but at the time of the Wilcox episode their methods were beginning to diverge; the younger was rather apt to entice people, and, in enticing them, to be herself enticed; the elder went straight ahead, and accepted an occasional failure as part of the game.
An episode of humour or kindness touches and amuses him here and there--a pretty child looking at a gingerbread stall; a pretty girl blushing whilst her lover talks to her and chooses her fairing; poor Tom Fool, yonder behind the waggon, mumbling his bone with the honest family which lives by his tumbling; but the general impression is one more melancholy than mirthful.
The episode of the elections served as a good occasion for a capital dinner.