Tertius

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Tertius

(tûr`shəs), in the New Testament, amanuensis of the Letter to the Romans.
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(23.) See, respectively, Schreiner, Romans, 330; Moo, The Epistle to the Romans, 396; John Murray, The Epistle to the Romans (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1959), 233.
The commentary is an interpretation of the first verse of Paul's Epistle to the Romans. Agamben's thesis is that each word contracts within itself in a recapitulation the complete text of the Epistle (as we have seen, recapitulation is an important term of the messianistic dictionary).
At the end of the t-shirt, there is a long small print passage which carries a number of definitions of sin, including one from the Bible from epistle to the Romans, chapter seven.
Drawing primarily on three chapters from Paul's Epistle to the Romans, Nostnz Aetate continued to proclaim the infallibility of the Church while radically altering what Catholic theology said about Jews.
Keys for Interpretating the Epistle to the Romans, Roma: GBP, 2010, 334 PP., 15 x 21, ISBN 978-88-7653-647-2.
Chapters 9-11 of Paul's epistle to the Romans are set in the context of the entire letter.
In his 1951 study of Barth, Hans Urs yon Balthasar traced a development from dialectics (Epistle to the Romans) to analogy (Church Dogmatics), resulting in a "mature" Barth more open to Roman Catholicism than ever before.
In that sense, Taubes said, "the Epistle to the Romans is a political theology, a political declaration of war on the Caesar." And it was a Jewish political declaration of war because it held a universal law higher than the arbitrary dictates of an emperor who claimed to be a god.
Ignatius of Antioch's Epistle to the Romans or the Passion of Perpetua provide us with gory passages, in which the process of being eaten by beasts is presented as a most desirable death.
(The Macmillan Company, 1959) informs us that he chose that name from the fifth chapter of the Epistle to the Romans in his King James Bible: "...
"The Epistle to the Romans has become the e-pistle to Welsh speakers."
His Origen, Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (The Fathers of the Church, A New Translation, vol.