epithalamium

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epithalamium

(ĕp'ĭthəlā`mēəm), song or poem written to celebrate a marriage. An elaborate form of pastoralpastoral,
literary work in which the shepherd's life is presented in a conventionalized manner. In this convention the purity and simplicity of shepherd life is contrasted with the corruption and artificiality of the court or the city.
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, the epithalamium usually tells of the happenings of the wedding day. Nymphs, shepherds, and appropriate mythological figures are present to share the poet's joy. Epithalamiums were written in ancient times by Pindar, Sappho, and Catullus. The biblical Song of Solomon is a classic of the genre as is Edmund Spenser's "Epithalamium" (1595), written to celebrate his own marriage.

epithalamium

poem in honor of bride and groom. [Western Lit.: LLEI, 1: 283]
References in periodicals archive ?
Recognizing the seductiveness of this inviting touch, Whitman embraces the water as a lover, hurling himself expectantly into its sousing arms, as do Hopkins' yo ung epithalamic bathers:
And, given the above, would we be overly surprised if those parted lips--armatured by many a rousing blast of a phallic trumpet--had inspired Hopkins with the same "flashing" passion we have already seen enveloping his epithalamic stranger, a passion clearly elucidated by Whitman in "The Mystic Trumpeter":
11), with all of its erotic connotations, could just as easily have been acquired at a Penmaen or epithalamic pool, where even listless strangers can partake in a watery communion with the "Thou mastering me / God," a God who is not only the "giver of breath and bread," but also t he giver of the "World's strand [and] sway of the sea" ("Deutschland," II.
Although hesitant, although fearful of the Whitmanesque "souse upon me of my lover the sea"--the liquid embodiment of an "eminently sexual, rapacious, and wholly virile God"--Hopkins' stranger nevertheless accepts the sensual treats offered by the epithalamic waterworld, and immediately "feasts: [for] lovely all is
9) of the moorland water-rushing "boisterously beautiful, between I Roots and rocks" for the delight of boys-into something calmer, something which "warbles" into the epithalamic coffer with the rhythmic trills and thrills and quavers expectant of a satisfied bird.