epithalamium

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epithalamium

(ĕp'ĭthəlā`mēəm), song or poem written to celebrate a marriage. An elaborate form of pastoralpastoral,
literary work in which the shepherd's life is presented in a conventionalized manner. In this convention the purity and simplicity of shepherd life is contrasted with the corruption and artificiality of the court or the city.
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, the epithalamium usually tells of the happenings of the wedding day. Nymphs, shepherds, and appropriate mythological figures are present to share the poet's joy. Epithalamiums were written in ancient times by Pindar, Sappho, and Catullus. The biblical Song of Solomon is a classic of the genre as is Edmund Spenser's "Epithalamium" (1595), written to celebrate his own marriage.

epithalamium

poem in honor of bride and groom. [Western Lit.: LLEI, 1: 283]
References in periodicals archive ?
9) of the moorland water-rushing "boisterously beautiful, between I Roots and rocks" for the delight of boys-into something calmer, something which "warbles" into the epithalamic coffer with the rhythmic trills and thrills and quavers expectant of a satisfied bird.
The sensual pleasures of the epithalamic pool are far more ambiguous than the syntactical options of the word "froliclavish.
Like an unnoticed memento mori, the leaves above the epithalamic pool "Hang as still as hawk or hawkmoth," the first recognizable as Hopkins' elegant-yet-deadly "Windhover" suspended above its prey; the second, a more common harbinger of death--both motionless, both waiting.
The watery window of this epithalamic cathedral is reminiscent of the stained glass of St.
Fielding's epithalamic passages are characterized by the total absence of epic machinery, in contrast to the classical epithalamia.
With the imagery of the gods employed to the disadvantage of the main characters in unsettling situations, Fielding, by negative example, announces his rationale for the simple diction of the epithalamic passages at the conclusion of Joseph Andrews.
Fanny, here depicted as natural and pure, imitates the epithalamic bride, a point emphasized in a convoluted way by her undistinguished parents and her betrothal to a former footman who gains a measure of status as the son of a merchant.
The epithalamic in Joseph Andrews begins with a simple phrase: 'At length the happy Day arrived, which was to put Joseph in the possession of all his Wishes' (p.
In the epithalamic prose passage, Fielding seems to have had Spenser's work in mind as the paradigm for his marriage portrait of Fanny:
Incremental movements in the epithalamic chorale, from the morning awakening to the bridal bed, find parallel passages in Spenser and Fielding.
The concluding pages of Joseph Andrews, the epithalamic imitation, transform the wedding feast and the consummation of the marriage into an erotic ritual celebrated by orgasmic compression and intensity.
342), at night is characteristically the son of Venus in this epithalamic setting; he joins Fanny with dispatch: 'Joseph no sooner heard she was in Bed, than he fled with the utmost Eagerness to her.