Epokha

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Epokha

 

(Epoch), a Russian monthly literary and political journal published in St. Petersburg from 1864 to 1865 by M. M. and F. M. Dostoevsky in place of their journal Vremia (Time). Epokha contained works by such writers as F. M. Dostoevsky, A. A. Grigor’ev, N. N. Strakhov, I. S. Turgenev, and N. S. Leskov. It was a vehicle for the ideas of pochvennichestvo (a Russian literary and social movement of the 1860’s), which were similar to the program of the Slavophiles. Epokha carried on polemics with Sovremennik (The Contemporary) and Russkoe Slovo (Russian Word).

REFERENCE

Nechaeva, V. S. Zhurnal M. M. i F. M. Dostoevskikh “Epokha,” 1864–1865. Moscow, 1975.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(11) See, e.g., article clusters in Slavic Review, Russian History, and Antropologicheskiiforum: Peter Rutland and Victoria Smolkin-Rothrock, "Introduction: Looking Back at Brezhnev," Russian History 41, 3 (2014): 299-306; "Redefining Community in the Late Soviet Union," Slavic Review 74, 1 (2015): 1-103; and "Epokha Brezhneva v antropologicheskoi retrospektive," Antropologicheskii forum, no.
Vasil'chuk, "Epokha NTR: konveiernaya revolyutsiya i gosudarstvo" [The Science-Technology Revolution: The Conveyer Revolution and the State], Politicheskie issledovaniya [Political Research] 3, 1996, 14-5.
von Raukh, "Epokha nashei pervoi revolutsii 1905-1907," tetrad' no.
In: Epokha Prosvescheniya (The Age of Enlightenment).
The literary and civic "thick journals" of the educated as well as mass circulation newspapers and magazines, the highly cultured poetry of this "silver age" in Russian literature and the crudest boulevard fiction, all shared a quite public preoccupation with the meanings and moods of "our times." Indeed, among the diagnosed meanings of the age was that it had become an unprecedented "epoch of moods" (epokha nastroenii), (1) Like familiar definitions of modernity itself--a frame in which these emotions were often interpreted--these were fractured and heteroglot moods, ranging from ecstatic joy to suicidal despair.
Rashit Vagapov: lichnost', tvorchestvo, epokha = Rashit Vagapov: zaman, ijat, shakhes.
Dostoevsky had to survive other grave crises: following the success of The House of the Dead, he endured the crushing blows of the death of his wife, the death of his beloved brother Mikhail, the mistaken suppression of his booming journal, Vremya (Time), and the collapse of its successor Epokha (Epoch).
Ekaterina Velikaia: Epokha Rossiiskai Istorii, St Petersburg, 1996.
(eds.), Istoriia krest'ianstva v Europe: epokha feodalizma [History of the Peasantry in Europe: Feudal Epoch], 3 vols.
When Vremya was suppressed, the brothers founded another magazine, Epokha, in which they published Zapiski iz podpolya (1864; Notes from the Underground).
In this periodical, Epokha (Epoch), appeared Notes from Underground, the work that is generally cited, because of its artistic excellence and psychological acuteness, as the first of Dostoyevsky's mature writings.