Adhara

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Adhara

(ădhâr`ə), bright star in the constellation Canis MajorCanis Major
[Lat.,=greater dog], constellation lying near the celestial equator, SE of Orion. Known as the Large Dog (Canis Minor is the Small Dog), it was associated with the figure of a dog by many cultures; the ancient Greeks identified it as one of Orion's hunting dogs,
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; Bayer designation ε Canis Majoris; 1992 position R.A. 6h58.3m, Dec. −31°54'. A bluish-white giant (spectral class B2 II) with apparent magnitudemagnitude,
in astronomy, measure of the brightness of a star or other celestial object. The stars cataloged by Ptolemy (2d cent. A.D.), all visible with the unaided eye, were ranked on a brightness scale such that the brightest stars were of 1st magnitude and the dimmest stars
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 1.5, it is one of the 25 brightest stars in the sky. Adhara is a visual binary starbinary star
or binary system,
pair of stars that are held together by their mutual gravitational attraction and revolve about their common center of mass. In 1650 Riccioli made the first binary system discovery, that of the middle star in the Big Dipper's handle, Zeta
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 with combined luminosity about 8,000 times that of the sun; its distance is about 700 light-years. The name is from the Arabic meaning "virgin."

Adhara

(ă-day -rah, -dah -) (∊ CMa) A very luminous remote blue-white giant that is the second brightest star in the constellation Canis Major. It is a visual binary star with an 8th-magnitude companion at a fixed separation of 8″. mv : 1.5; Mv : –4.8; spectral type: B2 II; distance: 175 pc.

Adhara

[ə′där·ə]
(astronomy)
A star of spectral type B2II. Also known as ε Canis Majoris.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cassinelli and colleagues at Wisconsin, the University of California at Berkeley, and Oxford University observed the relatively young, hot star Epsilon Canis Majoris in an attempt to uncover the energetic forces that drive stellar winds.
Epsilon Canis Majoris, a star about 600 light-years from Earth in the constellation Canis Major is much hotter than the sun and about 30,000 times as bright, seems to lose mass as atoms are blown off the top of its atmosphere by 600 mile-per-second gales, Cassinelli indicates.
Although Epsilon Canis Majoris appears through ground-based telescopes as a spot of relatively bright blue light, it emits much of its radiation in the form of extreme ultraviolet light.