Epsilon Indi


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Epsilon Indi

(Ɛ Ind) An orange-red main-sequence dwarf star in the constellation Indus that is a near neighbor of the Sun, lying at a distance of almost 3.62 parsecs. It is about 1.3 billion years old and is smaller and much dimmer than the Sun, having a surface temperature of about 4300 K. In 2003, a team of astronomers announced the detection of a brown dwarf possibly with a methane atmosphere circling Epsilon Indi at a separation of 1500 AU. The brown dwarf, now known as Epsilon Indi ba, is thought to have the same diameter as Jupiter but nearly 50 times its mass. Epsilon Indi ba is itself orbited by a brown dwarf, named Epsilon Indi bb. The Epsilon Indi system has a very large proper motion (about 4.7 seconds of arc per year) and over the next few thousand years will move out of Indus into the neighboring constellation Tucana. mv : 4.68; Mv : 6.89; spectral type: K5 Ve.
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It has now been discovered that epsilon Indi also harbours a family with a binary pair of brown dwarfs close to it.
The game starts 20 years before the events in Halo: Combat Evolved, on a planet in the Epsilon Indi star system called Harvest.
Camera (color, Betacam), Sandri; editor, Sandri in collaboration with Rosella Mocci; Music, Epsilon Indi.
By comparison, were we to observe our Sun from the distance of Epsilon Indi, it would shine at magnitude 2.
In addition to being close, Epsilon Indi is also moving quickly across the sky.
Then, in 2003, European astronomers announced the surprising discovery of a brown dwarf moving quite rapidly across the sky only a few arcminutes from Epsilon Indi.
No confirmed planets are yet known to orbit this yellow dwarf, but in January 2003 Ralf-Dieter Scholz (Astrophysical Institute of Potsdam, Germany) and three colleagues announced the discovery of Epsilon Indi B, a very faint companion that proved to be a brown dwarf, the nearest such object known.
Alessandro Marrazzo's sets are memorable, and music by the performance group Epsilon Indi has a haunting quality that conjures up Pozzuoli's ghosts.
Its new companion, dubbed Epsilon Indi B, is the closest starlike object found in 15 years and has the highest proper motion (fastest motion across the sky) found since the 1930s.
Its speed and direction turned out exactly to match those of Epsilon Indi A.
Epsilon Indi B enters the record books as part of the 18th-closest star system.