Eranthis


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Eranthis

 

(winter aconite), a genus of plants of the family Ranunculaceae. The low perennial herbs have a tuberous rhizome. The leaves are palmately dissected. The basal leaves are petiolate; the cauline leaves are sessile and arranged in whorls of three at the top of the stem. The large yellow flowers are solitary and have six bracts. There are seven or eight species, found in the temperate zone of Eurasia. The USSR has three or four species, in Middle Asia, southern Siberia, and the Far East. E. longistipitata grows on rocky slopes in Middle Asia. E. hyemalis and several other species are early-flowering spring ornamentals.

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The same is true with the pretty little snowflakes (Leucojum) and the winter aconites (Eranthis).
Moreover, yellow flowers can color borders, from the winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) and cornelian cherry dogwood (Cornus mas,) in early spring to our native witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) in the fall.
ANNE ROWLANDS VIA EMAIL HI ANNE, Yes this is Eranthis hyemalis, the winter aconite.
WITH buttercup-like flowers on glossy green foliage from January to March, winter aconites, or Eranthis hyemalis, can really cheer up a garden.
If you wish, add other rodent- and deer-resistant bulbs such as blue squill, eranthis, chionodoxa, snowdrops and snowflakes, together with ornamental onions.
Arnott' with a backdrop of Lenten hellebores and some winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) and you have a winner.
Winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) THIS hardy perennial with small, knobbly tubers produces vibrant yellow flowers above a ruff of bright green leaves in winter, just at a time when everything else is dull and dank.
ERANTHIS The winter aconite produces stunning bright yellow star-shaped flowers in deepest winter, each surrounded by a pretty, bright green ruff.
Daffodils, grape hyacinths, all of the flowering onions (Alliums), dogtooth violets (Erythronium), glory-of-the-snow (Chionodoxa), winter aconites (Eranthis), snowdrops Galanthus), scillas (Scilla), Grecian windflowers (Anemone), Guinea Hen flowers (Fritillaria), and wood hyacinths (Hyacinthoides) are seldom eaten by pests.
Earlier, during January and February, the winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) creates pools of gold.