Erastianism

(redirected from Erastian)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Erastianism

doctrine declaring state is superior to the church in ecclesiastical affairs (1524–1543). [Christian Hist.: EB, III: 937]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Restoration bishops by and large supported a divine right conception of monarchy, but they were also committed sacramentalists, dedicated to ordination and episcopal supremacy, and unwilling to countenance the Erastian doctrine that the king could exercise full ecclesiastical power.
In 1841, however, the Jerusalem Bishopric controversy convinces Newman that it is the Anglican and not the Catholic Church that represents the real Erastian threat.
And also an instinct not to press too hard a pair of antinomies this topic threatened to expose: Catholicism's relation to Erastian Anglicanism symbolized in Arthur; Catholic Christianity's relation to the modern.
Renan admired the erastian qualities of the English Church, especially its tolerance for the intellectual vagaries of the lettered class; but Renan felt the pressure of the Catholic Church from above, and he spoke in favor of the withering-away of religion.
The Erastian motives for dismantling the shrine and attacking the reputation of St.
Thus, Hobbes's Christianity was only skin-deep: he was much more an Erastian than a Protestant.
Within Anglicanism, moreover, an Erastian policy had been imposed by Henry VIII and defended by Richard Hooker.
If it is correct to call him a "Presbyterian" at all, he was, to use George Yule's distinction, an Erastian rather than a Melvillian Presbyterian.
In a book where most claims are overwhelmed by the plethora of detail, this is Jenkins's most explicit thesis: Jewel was a thoroughgoing Erastian.
This conflict between the visible and invisible communication of grace is not exclusive to Hooker, of course, but it does become for him an issue connected with his erastian tendencies: "It must be confessed that of Christ, working as a Creator, and a Governor of the world by providence, all are partakers; not all partakers of that grace whereby he inhabiteth whom he saveth" (2:232).
This uncompromising stance had long been the bottom line in his dealings with the Kirk and those who challenged the king's erastian vision.
This collection furnishes an admirable counterweight to a positive view of Henry's managerial skills in forging an Erastian "Anglican" middle way, as argued by George Bernard in The King's Reformation: Henry VIII and the Remaking of the English Church (New Haven, Conn.