Erastianism


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Erastianism

doctrine declaring state is superior to the church in ecclesiastical affairs (1524–1543). [Christian Hist.: EB, III: 937]
References in periodicals archive ?
The second was the pamphlet war amongst divines which flourished in the years immediately following the Marriage Act's passage and which pitted conventional and unorthodox High Church views against Whig Erastianism.
The first wave of the mid-century marriage debate as it was conducted between Anglican divines like Gally, Stebbing, and Warburton brought about an unexpected set of positions: Whig thinkers like Gally used concepts of natural law to posit a secular theory of sovereignty while sanctioning the role of state in private life; and Tory thinkers like Stebbing used the discourse of natural rights to rebut state power and assert a sovereign and divinely sanctioned individualism; while finally, in Warburton, Whig Erastianism moved toward an unorthodox concept of constitutionalism that redoubles the authority of the civil power by recourse to the divine.
See Crowley, Erastianism in England to 1640, supra note 541, at 559-66.
40) Collinson, Religion of Protestants, 150; on Erastianism, see ibid.
Besides being equally committed to Erastianism and sola scriptura, Jewel was divided by his work as a scholar and his duties as a bishop, and by his public persona as a staunch defender of the Elizabethan settlement and his private, precisian leanings, which often left him frustrated with the pace and direction of English reform.
12) Like erastianism in this context, the jure divino defenses of ruling eldership need fuller examination as to their roles, the most important of which may not have been clarification of ruling elders' biblical precedents but description of their proper qualifications, character, and functions.
It is not only the danger of Erastianism that was exposed but also an improper expansion of the State to assume the roles of moral, cultural, or intellectual improvement.
111); moreover, his Hebraic learning and Erastianism led him to be associated with Judaism by subsequent writers.
Collins argues that their critique was less about Hobbes's materialism and putative heresy or atheism than about the philosopher's Erastianism.
However, both stories hold importance for church life in nineteenth-century England, for, as Carter shows, both groups "were agreed in regarding the Church of England as a highly imperfect and artificial amalgam of irreconcilable elements held together in a crude Erastianism (4).
His attitude is optimistic and his hope is for continuing reform which would eliminate the Erastianism in the Elizabethan Settlement.
The revolutionary trauma of Charles I's execution and the church's exile had shaken the bishops' support of the long-dominant Erastianism in English ecclesiastical affairs.