Erastianism


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Erastianism

doctrine declaring state is superior to the church in ecclesiastical affairs (1524–1543). [Christian Hist.: EB, III: 937]
References in periodicals archive ?
But true Erastianism upheld the supremacy of state power over church power in doctrinal and ecclesiological matters.
Erastianism in the narrowest sense refers to the work of the sixteenth-century Heidelberg reformer Thomas Erastus, which specifically subordinated excommunication to the sovereign's jurisdiction.
This experience had serious implications for the church leadership's view of England's traditional Erastianism.
The supreme governor of the English church had no power to affect the most sacred rites of that church or its government; here is the great double bind of Anglican Erastianism after the Restoration.
The dire consequences of Erastianism for those who believed in jure divino episcopacy, consequences that were but a distant hypothetical for Laud, became a horrible reality for the church during the Interregnum.
Thorndike's willingness to use the full logic of jure divino episcopacy to divide authority into spiritual and secular and to condemn Erastianism openly is striking, but it was not unique.
76) For the formative generation that reestablished the church after 1660, the naked Erastianism of the royal supremacy proved distinctively less attractive than a revived dualism that emphasized the divine right of both king and priest.
12) Like erastianism in this context, the jure divino defenses of ruling eldership need fuller examination as to their roles, the most important of which may not have been clarification of ruling elders' biblical precedents but description of their proper qualifications, character, and functions.
Some will certainly wonder whether Hobbes's Erastianism was more incidental than essential or central.