Erechtheus


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Erechtheus

(ĕrĕk`thēəs), in Greek mythology, king of Athens. On the advice of an oracle he sacrificed one of his daughters during the battle between the Athenians and the Eleusinians. This enabled him to win the battle, but Poseidon later destroyed him and all his house. Erechtheus is often confused with ErichthoniusErichthonius
, in Greek mythology, son of Hephaestus and Athena, half man and half serpent. After his birth Athena concealed him in a chest that she gave to the daughters of Cecrops to keep. They opened it and were so frightened by Erichthonius' shape that they killed themselves.
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, his grandfather. Both were associated with the worship of Athena; one or the other is said to have built a temple which was the forerunner to the ErechtheumErechtheum
[for Erechtheus], Gr. Erechtheion, temple in Pentelic marble, on the Acropolis at Athens. One of the masterpieces of Greek architecture, it was constructed between c.421 B.C. and 405 B.C. to replace an earlier temple to Athena destroyed by the Persians.
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 built in the 5th cent. B.C., and to have established the Panathenaea (see AthenaAthena
, or Pallas Athena
, in Greek religion and mythology, one of the most important Olympian deities. According to myth, after Zeus seduced Metis he learned that any son she bore would overthrow him, so he swallowed her alive.
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).
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Erechtheus

inventor of chariots. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 91]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The play tells the story of the three daughters of Erechtheus, the mythical king of Athens, who was conceived when the sperm of the god Hephaestus soiled the garment of the horrified virgin Athena.
(12) Adam Roberts, "Hunting and Sacrifice in Swinburne's Atalanta in Calydon and Erechtheus," SEL 31 (1991): 760-761.
(14) Mallarme, 'Erechtheus: Tragedie par Swinburne', Oeuvres completes, ed.
From ancient times the sons of Erechtheus have been favored; they are children of the blessed gods sprung from a holy land never pillaged by the enemy.
(55) Hermes recounts how some twenty years earlier, Kreousa, daughter of King Erechtheus of Athens, was raped by Phoibos Apollo on the Acropolis (10-11).
No less a figure than the legendary king, Erechtheus, said to be a son of Athena, and honored with her as a hero of Athens, (54) was reputed to have sacrificed his youngest daughter after the Delphic Oracle indicated that this was the only way that Athens could fend off an attack by the Eleusinians.
Her son, Erechtheus became the first King of Athens and she was the city's protectress.
Thus in Erechtheus, the sacrifice of the princess Chthonia secures for a time the culture of Athens, enabling everything that city has meant for humanity; that is to say, permitting the perfect expression, for a time, of the ambiguity to which her death contributes.
It housed a wooden statue of the goddess supposedly dropped from the heavens to that spot on the Acropolis during the reign of the legendary king Erechtheus. It also enshrined an imprint in the rock of the Acropolis, the site where Poseidon stuck his trident in the rock in a fight with Athena over possession of the Acropolis.
1837 A more careful check would have likewise removed such things as this on Erechtheus: 'The reviews were generally good, there being nothing in the way of subject-matter to which they could object' (p.
What of the oracles demanding human sacrifice, as in Agamemnon, Heraclidae, Phoenissae, Erechtheus, and Iphigeneia in Aulis?
Zoser, who built the pyramid at Saqqara, was black (Diop quotes Petrie); the pharaohs from Upper Egypt of the middle and New Kingdoms were black, and Erechtheus 'who unified Attica' came to Greece from Egypt and hence was black.