Erechtheus


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Erechtheus

(ĕrĕk`thēəs), in Greek mythology, king of Athens. On the advice of an oracle he sacrificed one of his daughters during the battle between the Athenians and the Eleusinians. This enabled him to win the battle, but Poseidon later destroyed him and all his house. Erechtheus is often confused with ErichthoniusErichthonius
, in Greek mythology, son of Hephaestus and Athena, half man and half serpent. After his birth Athena concealed him in a chest that she gave to the daughters of Cecrops to keep. They opened it and were so frightened by Erichthonius' shape that they killed themselves.
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, his grandfather. Both were associated with the worship of Athena; one or the other is said to have built a temple which was the forerunner to the ErechtheumErechtheum
[for Erechtheus], Gr. Erechtheion, temple in Pentelic marble, on the Acropolis at Athens. One of the masterpieces of Greek architecture, it was constructed between c.421 B.C. and 405 B.C. to replace an earlier temple to Athena destroyed by the Persians.
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 built in the 5th cent. B.C., and to have established the Panathenaea (see AthenaAthena
, or Pallas Athena
, in Greek religion and mythology, one of the most important Olympian deities. According to myth, after Zeus seduced Metis he learned that any son she bore would overthrow him, so he swallowed her alive.
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).

Erechtheus

inventor of chariots. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 91]
References in periodicals archive ?
12) Adam Roberts, "Hunting and Sacrifice in Swinburne's Atalanta in Calydon and Erechtheus," SEL 31 (1991): 760-761.
If so, this "memory of signs" which makes the act of construction possible is perhaps nothing less than that "musicality" of which I spoke earlier, an inner music of echo and silence, of "strophe and antistrophe," as Mallarme finds it in Swinburne's Erechtheus.
146) the recent interpretation of the Parthenon frieze as the story of King Erechtheus rather than as a depiction of the Panathenaic procession (Connelly 1996).
But, in Swinburne's second Hellenic drama, Erechtheus, the sacrifice of a young woman for the benefit of the polis constitutes the emotional center of the plot.
Published in 1876, to a generally warm critical reception, Swinburne regarded Erechtheus as his greatest dramatic achievement and a companion poem to Atalanta.
Jerome McGann points out that Erechtheus shares "many of the essential premises of Atalanta in Calydon" in that "the world is the word of man, that love is the source of all life, and that tragedy is the perfect aesthetic model, both as source and explanation, of human existence.
The similarities between Callirrhoe and Erechtheus begin with the sacrifice of the female protagonist, as a prelude to the re-establishment of order.
Next, Maxwell turns to Erechtheus (misspelled throughout as Erectheus), which she considers as continuing the radical tone of "Siena" and "Hertha," mainly in the manner it depicts its central female figures.
It now contains online versions of Atalanta in Calydon, Poems and Ballads (1866 and 1878 editions), Erechtheus, Songs Before Sunrise, Songs of the Springtides, Studies in Song, The Tale of Balen, and Tristram of Lyonesse.
Atalanta and Erechtheus were represented only by a couple of choruses.
edu/swinburne/makes available the entire text of Poems and Ballads, First Series (1866), Erechtheus (1876), Studies in Song (1880), and Tristram of Lyonesse (1882)--all from the good Chatto & Windus edition of the Poems published in 1904--and also the first two volumes of prose works from the Bonchurch Edition.
Swinburne presents rapes and near rapes throughout his lyrical work, in "The Nightingale," "At Eleusis," "Les Noyades," "The Leper," "Itylus," Atalanta, Erechtheus, "The Garden of Cymodoce," and "A Nympholept.