Erechtheus


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Erechtheus

(ĕrĕk`thēəs), in Greek mythology, king of Athens. On the advice of an oracle he sacrificed one of his daughters during the battle between the Athenians and the Eleusinians. This enabled him to win the battle, but Poseidon later destroyed him and all his house. Erechtheus is often confused with ErichthoniusErichthonius
, in Greek mythology, son of Hephaestus and Athena, half man and half serpent. After his birth Athena concealed him in a chest that she gave to the daughters of Cecrops to keep. They opened it and were so frightened by Erichthonius' shape that they killed themselves.
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, his grandfather. Both were associated with the worship of Athena; one or the other is said to have built a temple which was the forerunner to the ErechtheumErechtheum
[for Erechtheus], Gr. Erechtheion, temple in Pentelic marble, on the Acropolis at Athens. One of the masterpieces of Greek architecture, it was constructed between c.421 B.C. and 405 B.C. to replace an earlier temple to Athena destroyed by the Persians.
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 built in the 5th cent. B.C., and to have established the Panathenaea (see AthenaAthena
, or Pallas Athena
, in Greek religion and mythology, one of the most important Olympian deities. According to myth, after Zeus seduced Metis he learned that any son she bore would overthrow him, so he swallowed her alive.
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).

Erechtheus

inventor of chariots. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 91]
References in periodicals archive ?
When Poseidon's son Eumolpos attacks Athens with an army of Thracians, Erechtheus learns that only by sacrificing one of his daughters can Athens prevail.
12) Adam Roberts, "Hunting and Sacrifice in Swinburne's Atalanta in Calydon and Erechtheus," SEL 31 (1991): 760-761.
If so, this "memory of signs" which makes the act of construction possible is perhaps nothing less than that "musicality" of which I spoke earlier, an inner music of echo and silence, of "strophe and antistrophe," as Mallarme finds it in Swinburne's Erechtheus.
Thus in Erechtheus, the sacrifice of the princess Chthonia secures for a time the culture of Athens, enabling everything that city has meant for humanity; that is to say, permitting the perfect expression, for a time, of the ambiguity to which her death contributes.
It housed a wooden statue of the goddess supposedly dropped from the heavens to that spot on the Acropolis during the reign of the legendary king Erechtheus.
Zoser, who built the pyramid at Saqqara, was black (Diop quotes Petrie); the pharaohs from Upper Egypt of the middle and New Kingdoms were black, and Erechtheus 'who unified Attica' came to Greece from Egypt and hence was black.
What of the oracles demanding human sacrifice, as in Agamemnon, Heraclidae, Phoenissae, Erechtheus, and Iphigeneia in Aulis?
In later times only a great snake was thought to share the temple with Athena, and there is evidence that Erechtheus was or became a snake or an earth or ancestor spirit.
2013 Beadle 1972 Carausius morosus Sinety -- -- Bordas 1897 Acanthoderus spinosus Gray, -- Yes Hermarchus pythonius Westwood, Sipyloidea erechtheus Westwood Caarels 2011 Extatosoma tiaratum Macleay No Yes Cameron 1912 Bacillus rossi Rossi Yes No Chopard 1949 Order Phasmatodea No No Clark 1976 Extatosoma tiaratum Macleay -- Yes de Sinety 1901 Carausius morosus Sinety Yes -- Heymons 1897 Bacillus rossi Rossi Yes No Judd 1948 Order Phasmatodea -- Yes Marshall & Diapheromera femorata Say No No Severin 1906 Monteiro et Cladomorphus phyllinus Gray No Yes al.
A similar musical structure can be tracked in Erechtheus, and the fact that an early attempt at lines 155 to 188 of "Anactoria" is drafted on a page of the Atalanta in Calydon manuscript suggests more than just a thematic kinship between those works.
He was the son of the god Poseidon and Chione ("Snow Girl"), daughter of the north wind, Boreas; after various adventures he became king in Thrace but was killed while helping the Eleusinians in their war against Erechtheus of Athens.
But, in Swinburne's second Hellenic drama, Erechtheus, the sacrifice of a young woman for the benefit of the polis constitutes the emotional center of the plot.