eremite

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eremite

a Christian hermit or recluse
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Um fato importante para se ter em mente e que varios pontos as margens do rio Paraguai, incluindo seus bracos, nao alagam por tratarem se de aterros indigenas feitos pelos Guato ha centenas de anos, e muitos estao dentro das areas protegidas que por decadas proibem acesso a estes espacos outrora utilizados pela comunidade da Barra do Sao Lourenco, espacos esses, que representavam o modo de vida dessas populacoes e servem como refugio nas estacoes chuvosas e de cheias (EREMITES DE OLIVEIRA, 2003 e 2007; CHIARAVALLOTI et al.
eremites in Mexico), being brightly colored and living in vegetation.
In it were poems by Li Po ("the high heavenly priest of the White Lake," Charles calls him in "Portrait of the Artist with Li Po"), Tu Fu, T'ao Ch'ien, and Wang Wei--master eremites all.
vulgaris near a lake in Sweden where simuliid black flies were abundant, dipterans represented 85% of the 915 captured arthropods; among these, Cnephia eremites and Cnephia pallipes accounted for >97% of the total number of blackflies (Adler and Malmqvist, 2004).
Did those eremites really find God in their huts--or just ten feet squared of the void?
Chapter one, "Precursors and Emergence," begins with early Christianity and its roots in Judaism and Hellenistic culture, and chapters two through eight take us through the next thousand years, from eremites in Egypt and Syria to Constantinople itself.
In his poem Milton explains that Chaos is where sinners will eventually end up, finding there "Fit retribution" (1977, III.454); among these unlucky souls will be "Embryos, and Idiots, Eremites and Friars" (474; my emphasis).
But neither do we flourish as solitary eremites. Our existence, like the rearing of our young, is inherently social.
In the West, our words "monk" and "monastic" contain and express solitude (from ancient Greek monos, "one alone").(*) And yet in both West and East, the practice evolved from the earliest, wandering hermits ("eremites") to become communal ("cenobitic").