Eremurus


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Related to Eremurus: Eremurus robustus

Eremurus

 

(desert candle), a genus of herbs of the family Liliaceae. (The genus is sometimes divided into several genera.) The rhizome is compact; the roots are dense, frequently fleshy, and spindle-shaped. The leaves are radical, long, and linear. The flower stalk is much longer than the leaves. The inflorescence is a many-flowered terminal raceme. The perianth may be white, yellow, pink, reddish, or brown. The fruit is a spherical capsule.

Of the more than 50 species, at least 30 occur in the USSR. They are found from the Crimea and the Caucasus to the Altai and Himalayas. The plants occur in steppes and deserts at elevations to 3,500 m. Many species are ornamental, particularly E. olgae and E. robustus. The roots of some species, for example, E. spectabilis, contain dextrine and other substances used to make glue. Paint is produced from the leaves. Young shoots are edible when cooked. The plants are nectar-bearers.

REFERENCE

Khokhriakov, A. P. Eremurusy i ikh kul’tura. Moscow, 1965.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lobby of the museum was centered with a towering arrangement of white beauty eremurus, white gladioli, green hydrangeas, white mountain lilies, Creme de la Creme roses, blush roses, buttercream stock, and white hybrid delphinium.
Analysis and the study of the developmental structure and karyotype of several species of Eremurus and the effect of GA3 treatment on its germination (Masters thesis) Islamic Azad university- Tehran (shomal)- Iran.
Choose from the orange-yellow Eremurus Moneymaker, the salmon pink Roford, or the white himalaicus.
The foxtail lilies of the genus Eremurus (Liliaceae) are quite unusual in deserts.
Examples include gladiolus, delphinium, larkspur, eremurus, and snapdragon.
DESERT CANDLE see Eremurus DIANTHUS (see Plate 8) (die-ANTH-us)
Towering Eremurus, those great foxtail lilies, make a theatrical show, but they too need good drainage.
Peonies, an assorted garden rose collection, and dramatic peach eremurus were among the gorgeous blooms highlighted in the entrance and sanctuary arrangements.
I have tried a couple of times to grow eremurus here, known as 'Foxtail Lilies' or 'Desert Lilies'.
Water from snow melt and rainfall promotes the growth of the ephemeral and ephemeroid plants, such as Erodium oxyrrhynchum, Lappula sp, Nonea caspica, Tragopogon sabulosus, Eremurus sp and Erysimum cheiranthoides (Yang et al.
Or you could combine them with other yellow or lime green fl owers, such as eremurus, yellow Ilios roses, Midori anthurium and green cymbidium orchids.
FOXTAIL lilies, or eremurus, create a spectacular display, at the back of a bed or border.