Ehrenburg

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Ehrenburg

, Erenburg
Ilya Grigorievich . 1891--1967, Soviet novelist and journalist. His novel The Thaw (1954) was the first published in the Soviet Union to deal with repression under Stalin
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the economy, people are very concerned about bringing trouble on themselves," Erenburg says.
Results of Erenburg and Wohar (1995), Pereira (2001, 2003), Pereira and Roca-Sagales (2001), Hyder (2002) and Naqvi (2002) showed that public investment crowds in private investment while Pradhan, Ratha and Sarma (1990), Haque and Montiel (1993), Ahmed (1994), Voss (2002) and Narayan (2004) showed that public investment crowds out private investment.
Though the play was a little altered, it was not the result of a struggle with the playwright, or of overcoming him (as occurred in other cases with such authors as Erenburg, Selvinskii, and Vishnevskii).
Commenting on Proust's novel at the first congress of Soviet writers, Il'ia Erenburg scornfully observed that the hero of the 'degenerating bourgeois novel' did only one thing: he loved.
An usher found a bag under a seat in the theater hall after the performance of a play adapted from an Ilya Erenburg novel.
Samosud, Barsova, Kozlovskii, Il'ia Erenburg." Glikman carefully notes the "hidden subtext" in this sentence, distinguishing between the close friendship of Oborin and the merely "good relations" between Shostakovich and the other individuals listed.
Occasionally things get completely out of control, as in the late Mikhail Agursky's essay on 'Nietzschean roots of Stalinist culture', where the cumulative repetition of unproven assertions climaxes in the astonishing claim that Aleksei Tolstoi and Erenburg were saved from Stalin's purges by their Nietzscheanism (pp.
Gorn, The Manly Art: Bare-Knuckle Prize Fighting (1986); Roy Rosenzweig, Eight Hours For What We Will: Workers and Leisure in an Industrial City (1983); John Kasson, Amusing the Million: Coney Island at the Turn of the Century (1978); Lewis Erenburg, Steppin' Out: New York Nightlife and the Transformation of American Culture, 1880-1930 (1981); Robert Snyder, Voice of the City: Vaudeville and Popular Culture in New York (1989); Robert Allen, Horrible Prettiness: Burlesque and American Culture (1991).
Erenburg (1993) reports results supporting the complementarity hypothesis, although the statistical significance of the result is not indicated.
Erenburg spent much of his early life in Paris, where he published his first book of poems (1911).
As he told Clara Malraux in private--Ilya Ehrenburg (II'ia Erenburg) had accompanied her and her husband, the famous French writer Andre Malraux, from Paris to the Soviet Union to attend the congress--"I have the right not to write.