Hawksbill Turtle

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Related to Eretmochelys: hawksbill turtle, Chelonia, Hawksbill Sea Turtle

Hawksbill Turtle

 

(Eretmochelys imbricata), a reptile of the family Chelonidae. The length of the shell is up to 85 cm. The dorsal shield is dark brown or chestnut colored with a yellow or rose design of spots and rays; the ventral shield is yellow.

The hawksbill turtle is found in all tropical and subtropical seas. It feeds on mollusks and fish, and partly on water plants. It leaves the water only during reproduction. Each year the female hawksbill turtles deposit more than 100 eggs on low sandy banks. The development lasts approximately 60 days. The horny shields which cover the hawksbill turtle’s shell (known as tortoiseshell) are highly valued and have long been an object of commerce. Hawksbill turtles are caught on the shore during reproduction, often before they can deposit their eggs. As a result of increased annihilation, the number of hawksbill turtles has decreased sharply. The flesh is not used as food.

References in periodicals archive ?
The estimated carapace size of the Louisiana specimen would be unusually great for Eretmochelys or Lepidochelys, reasonable for Chelonia, and probably of subadult dimensions for Caretta, based on comparisons to the extant species.
The hawksbill turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata, is such a creature.
Five species of sea turtles (Kemp's ridley, Lepidochelys kempii; leatherback, Dermochelys coriacea; hawksbill, Eretmochelys imbricata; loggerhead, Caretta caretta; and green, Chelonia mydas) occur in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic and may be affected by shrimping activities (Magnuson et al.
The reef system at Bajo de Sico also serves as an important foraging and residential habitat for the endangered hawksbill turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata.
Genetic studies of the hawksbill turtle Eretmochelys imbricata: evidence for multiple stocks in Australian waters.