aid

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aid

1. Mountaineering any of various devices such as piton or nut when used as a direct help in the ascent
2. (in medieval Europe; in England after 1066) a feudal payment made to the king or any lord by his vassals, usually on certain occasions such as the marriage of a daughter or the knighting of an eldest son

AID

References in periodicals archive ?
2) Most of these natural ergogenic aids are considered legal in international sports competition, with the exception of glycerol.
2,37) The interest in creatine as an ergogenic aid revolves around its ability to participate as an energy substrate for muscle contraction.
Conversely, Wadler and Hainline (1989) have suggested that athletes maybe more likely to experiment with recreational and ergogenic aids than individuals not participating in athletics.
In part 3 of this series, each ergogenic aid in Table 2 will be discussed, if it was not previously discussed in part 1.
Nutritional ergogenic aids are substances which enhance the athletic performance by influencing physiological as well as psychological process.
The role of glutamine as an ergogenic aid has not been demonstrated in the scientific literature.
The purpose of our survey was to determine the use of oral creatine as an ergogenic aid among the adolescent athlete population.
Second only to adequate hydration, a caloric-sufficient diet is the most important ergogenic aid.
Overall, basic scientific research supports the opinion that PRP is unlikely to provide a potent ergogenic aid for the following reasons:
Both aerobic and anaerobic athletes use pre-workout energy drinks because of their potential ergogenic effects and they have attracted the attention of many competitive and recreational athletes as a legal ergogenic aid (Sokmen et al.
To date, many research trials have demonstrated caffeine to be an ergogenic aid for exercise of varying intensities, durations and modalities in an athletic population (Bell and McLellan, 2002; Bridge and Jones, 2006; Bruce et al.