Bearded Seal

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Bearded Seal

 

(Erignathus barbatus), a pinniped of the family Phocidae. It measures 2.2–2.6 m long and weighs 225–360 kg. The pelage is grayish brown, sometimes with a few light spots on the back; the pelage of the newborn is dark. The bearded seal inhabits the arctic regions of the Atlantic Ocean, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the White, Barents, Kara, Chukchi, and Bering seas. It usually lives solitary in shallow waters and reproduces in the spring on drifting ice. It feeds on bottom invertebrates; more rarely, on fish. The bearded seal is a valuable object of commerce.

REFERENCES

Chapskii, K. Morskie zveri Sovetskoi Arktiki. Leningrad-Moscow, 1941.
Mlekopitaiushchie fauny SSSR, vol. 2. Moscow-Leningrad, 1963.
Krylov, V. I., G. A. Fedoseev, and A. P. Shustov. Lastonogie Dal’nego Vostoka. Moscow, 1964.
References in periodicals archive ?
Feeding of the bearded seal Erignathus barbatus nauticus (Pallas) in the Bering Sea during the spring-summer period.
The walrus cannot remain under water for nearly so long a period as the seal, neither can he sustain the pressure of the water at anything like the depth to which the great seal can descend: the walrus goes ashore on the beach or rocks, and the great Spitzbergen seal [what Lamont called Phoca barbota is now Erignathus barbatus, the bearded seal] although he basks on ice,--both fixed and floating,-is never known to go on land or even to lie on a half-tide rock; the walrus is gregarious and the great seal solitary, even two seldom being found together; the young walrus lives with his dam for two seasons, while the young seals are believed to leave the protection of the old ones at a few days old and to shift for themselves like young fishes.
Some aspects of growth and reproduction of the bearded seal Erignathus barbatus (Erxleben).