Bearded Seal

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bearded Seal

 

(Erignathus barbatus), a pinniped of the family Phocidae. It measures 2.2–2.6 m long and weighs 225–360 kg. The pelage is grayish brown, sometimes with a few light spots on the back; the pelage of the newborn is dark. The bearded seal inhabits the arctic regions of the Atlantic Ocean, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the White, Barents, Kara, Chukchi, and Bering seas. It usually lives solitary in shallow waters and reproduces in the spring on drifting ice. It feeds on bottom invertebrates; more rarely, on fish. The bearded seal is a valuable object of commerce.

REFERENCES

Chapskii, K. Morskie zveri Sovetskoi Arktiki. Leningrad-Moscow, 1941.
Mlekopitaiushchie fauny SSSR, vol. 2. Moscow-Leningrad, 1963.
Krylov, V. I., G. A. Fedoseev, and A. P. Shustov. Lastonogie Dal’nego Vostoka. Moscow, 1964.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Au cours de 239,4 heures d'observation soutenue, la presence d'un total de 312 phoques representant quatre especes a ete notee : le phoque barbu (Erignathus barbatus), le phoque a capuchon (Crystophora cristata), le phoque du Groenland (Pagophilus groenlandicus) et le phoque annele (Pusa hispida).
Biology of the bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) in Alaska, 1960-2009.
The bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) is the largest of the northern Pacific Ocean seals in the family Phocidae, first described by Gray in 1825.
Natural history and ecology of the bearded seal, Erignathus barbatus. Final Report OCSEAP, Research Unit 230.
A number of marine mammals, including narwhals (Monodon monoceros), beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas), bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus), and bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus), are known to occur in Baffin Bay and Melville Bay off northwest Greenland (Finley and Renaud, 1980; Doidge and Finley, 1993; Dietz and Heide-Jorgensen, 1995; Stafford et al., 2008, 2012b).
Underwater acoustic behavior of bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) in the northeastern Chukchi Sea, 2007-2010.
The walrus cannot remain under water for nearly so long a period as the seal, neither can he sustain the pressure of the water at anything like the depth to which the great seal can descend: the walrus goes ashore on the beach or rocks, and the great Spitzbergen seal [what Lamont called Phoca barbota is now Erignathus barbatus, the bearded seal] although he basks on ice,--both fixed and floating,-is never known to go on land or even to lie on a half-tide rock; the walrus is gregarious and the great seal solitary, even two seldom being found together; the young walrus lives with his dam for two seasons, while the young seals are believed to leave the protection of the old ones at a few days old and to shift for themselves like young fishes.
Winter distribution of bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) in the Penny Strait area, Northwest Territories, as determined by underwater vocalizations.
Polar bears feed primarily on ringed seals (Phoca hispida) and to a lesser degree on bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) and spotted seals (Phoca largha).
Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feed primarily on the ringed seal (Phoca hispida) and to a lesser degree on other marine mammals, including bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus), beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), narwhal (Monodon monoceros), and walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) (Stirling and Archibald, 1977; Lowry et al., 1987; Smith, 1980; Smith and Sjare, 1990; Rugh and Shelden, 1993; Stirling and Oritsland, 1995).
The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is the most carnivorous of the ursids, feeding primarily on ringed seals (Phoca hispida) and secondarily on bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) (Stirling and McEwan, 1975; Smith, 1980; Stirling, 1988).
The usefulness of animals such as ringed seal (Phoca hispida), harp seal (Phoca groenlandica), bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus), and harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) as indicator species is due to the close relationship of their range, reproductive cycles, and life histories to sea ice.