Erinyes


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Related to Erinyes: Eumenides, Erinys

Erinyes

(ērĭn`ē-ēz): see FuriesFuries
or Erinyes
, in Greek and Roman religion and mythology, three daughters of Mother Earth, conceived from the blood of Uranus, when Kronos castrated him. They were powerful divinities that personified conscience and punished crimes against kindred blood,
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Erinyes

(the Furies) angry and avenging deities who pursue evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Leach, 347]
See: Anger

Erinyes

(Furies) three sisters who tormented those guilty of blood crimes, driving them mad. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 320]
See: Madness

Erinyes (Furies)

three sisters who pursue those guilty of blood crimes and drive them mad. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 320]
References in periodicals archive ?
Right from the start of his mission, Agamemnon's son appears as a young man prostrated by a mixture of resentment, resignation, and fear, giving signs of an overall affliction of the mind that is bound to become prominent in the course of the play to the point of leading him to show mad behaviors, as the Taurian messenger reports to Iphigenia: while he was driving the cattle to the shore, he had seen a stranger suddenly jump out of a cleft in the rocks where he was hiding and, trembling with frenzy (283; [phrase omitted]), start raving about the Erinyes trying to kill him (281-94).
The sight shows the adultery of Thyestes and Aerope, as well as the Erinyes "bred in the family" (1190), the incarnations of the familial curse.
Sarah Johnston (1994) argues that the Pandareids, when they are made servants to the Erinyes, become demonic spirits of the sort that the Greeks believed preyed upon infants, pregnant women, or those giving birth.
In mythology, "Al(l)ecto is one of the three Erinyes or Furies who "take[s] vengeance for guilt, especially for murder and heinous infra-family crimes" (123).
The foam raised created adult Aphrodite ("foam-arisen"), and the Erinyes (furies) emerged from the blood drops.
After that, you can be certain that the murderers -- Greek and Turkish Cypriot -- will start hearing the footsteps of the Erinyes (Furies in Greek mythology who punished the perpetrators of crimes) with dread.
The Furies, or in Greek the Erinyes, meaning "the avengers," were the underworld servants of Hades.
The exhibition's title also suggested a literal orientation toward language, referring to the principal verb conjugations in Italian, which end in "-are," "-ere" and "-ire." The artist adopts these same infinitive endings to symbolically clarify the leitmotifs he explored in the exhibition: The Are piece is intended as an altar; the Ere piece presents a metaphor for time; and the Ire piece depicts mythological agents, specifically the Furies, also known in Greco-Roman religion as Erinyes or Eumenides.
Edgeworth (2) qui refute l'assimilation des Dirae aux Furies et conclut qu'il y a trois Dirae dont Megere, et plusieurs Erinyes de nombre non specifie, mais incluant Allecto et Tisiphone), ou si lon doit supposer deux Dirae celestes aux cotes de la Furie Megere (cest l'interpretation de E.
(17) The parallel to Aeschylus's Oresteia, which I have not examined because it is not relevant to my purpose, goes something like this: as Orestes kills his mother and her lover, Aue kills his mother and stepfather; as Orestes is hunted by the "kindly ones" (an ironic name for the Erinyes), Aue is pursued by two men who are aware of his crime; and as Orestes is acquitted by Athena, Aue escapes at the end of the war (he settles in France).
At the dawn of Greek thought Heraclitus was already imagining that justice sets limits for the physical universe itself, "the sun will not overstep his measure; if he does the Erinyes, the handmaids of justice, will find him out." In a drunken sky we light up the suns we want.
The Erinyes (Furies) themselves are invoked, as though the aspiration to great heights must necessarily entail retributive punishment, as exemplified in Greek tragedy.