Ermak

Ermak:

see YermakYermak
or Ermak
, d. 1584?, Russian conqueror of Siberia; his name also occurs as Yermak Timofeyevich. The leader of a band of independent Russian Cossacks, he spent his early career plundering the czar's ships on the Volga and later entered the service of a merchant
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ermak

 

a city (until 1961 a village) in Pavlodar Oblast, Kazakh SSR. It is a landing on the Irtysh River 33 km above Pavlodar and the terminus of a 21-km railroad branch from the Pavlograd-Tselinograd line. Population, 28,000 (1970). Ermak’s factories produce ferroalloys, metal structures, and reinforced-concrete items. The Ermak State Regional Electric Power Plant is located there. The general technical department of the Pavlodar Industrial Institute, a physical culture technicum, a cultural and educational school, and a medical school are located in Ermak and the Irtysh-Karaganda canal originates nearby.


Ermak

 

an icebreaker of the USSR’s Arctic Fleet, named in honor of the cossack ataman Ermak Timofeevich. Displacement, 8,730 tons; length, 97.5 m; width, 21.6 m. It was built in Newcastle (Great Britain) and was commissioned in 1899.

The idea of building the Ermak was S. O. Makarov’s, and he supervised the engineering commission and the construction of the ship. The Ermak was the first icebreaker in the world capable of forcing its way through heavy ice and ensuring safe passage for vessels. In the summer of 1899 it made its first voyage to the arctic under the command of Makarov. It reached 81°28’ N lat. In its first 12 years the Ermak led more than 1,000 vessels through the Gulf of Finland. It took part in the Ice Cruise of the Baltic Fleet in 1919. Beginning in the 1930’s it did a great deal of work in various regions of the Arctic Ocean, and in February 1938 it helped rescue the crew of the Severnyi Polius station, headed by I. D. Papanin, from an ice floe. During the Great Patriotic War it supported vessel movements through ice in the Baltic. It was awarded the Order of Lenin in 1949 and was decommissioned in 1963.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
With your permission I will also quote you an extract from Rataziaev's story, Ermak and Zuleika:
"'Ermak,' said Zuleika, 'the world is cruel, and men are unjust.
Then shall the sword of the Cossacks sing and whistle over their heads!' cried Ermak with a furious look in his eyes."
What must Ermak have felt when he learnt that his Zuleika had been murdered, Barbara?--that, taking advantages of the cover of night, the blind old Kouchoum had, in Ermak's absence, broken into the latter's tent, and stabbed his own daughter in mistake for the man who had robbed him of sceptre and crown?
"'Oh that I had a stone whereon to whet my sword!' cried Ermak in the madness of his wrath as he strove to sharpen his steel blade upon the enchanted rock.
Then Ermak, unable to survive the loss of his Zuleika, throws himself into the Irtisch, and the tale comes to an end.
Olya Ermak Chernyak, Manager, Global Compliance 800-669-4248 * oermak@aitworldwide.com
However, Slovak students Patrik Jozefovi, Tomas Strba, Ivan ermak, Monika Klaskova, Patrik Modrovsky and their teacher Zuzana Formankova came up with the idea to use hair as a fertiliser to grow plants on the Moon."Thanks to this, we managed to collect a sufficient amount of materials to grow spinach," said Musilova, as quoted in the press release.
We told them that it is not possible," Andrei Ermak, minister of culture in Kaliningrad, told Russia's Interfax news agency.
for the construction of the icebreaker Ermak (1897-1898).
Ermak, "Cytokine-inducing and anti-inflammatory activity of chitosan and its low-molecular derivative," Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology, vol.