Erne


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Erne

(ûrn), river, 72 mi (116 km) long, rising in Lough Gowna, Co. Longford, N Republic of Ireland. It flows NW through SW Northern Ireland, then back through the Republic before entering the Atlantic Ocean at Donegal Bay. Grazing predominates in the Erne basin; EnniskillenEnniskillen
, town (1991 pop. 10,429), Fermanagh dist., SW Northern Ireland, on Cethlin's Island in the Erne River between Upper and Lower Loughs Erne. Farm produce is traded, and hosiery is manufactured. In 1689 the forces of William III defeated those of James II at Enniskillen.
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 is the chief town. In Northern Ireland the river expands to form two large lakes—Upper Lough Erne (10 mi/16.1 km long) and Lower Lough Erne (18 mi/29 km long). An international flood-control scheme (completed 1959) controls the water level in the lakes. Hydroelectricity is produced along the 150-ft (46-m) drop in the river's course between Belleek and Ballyshannon; the lakes are a natural reservoir.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Erne

 

(Lough Erne), a lake in Northern Ireland. Area, 123 sq km; depth, up to 69 m (the deepest lake in Ireland); water level, 46 m. The banks are high and forested. The Erne River flows through the lake, falling into Donegal Bay of the Atlantic Ocean. The lake is navigable.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Erne

a river in N central Republic of Ireland, rising in County Cavan and flowing north across the border, through Upper Lough Erne and Lower Lough Erne and then west to Donegal Bay. Length: about 96 km (60 miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to close market awareness and upfront information, Erne's plant located in Saudi Arabia can act quickly on market demands or specific customer requirements.
There's another sense in which Erne does not like to argue: much of Shakespeare and the Book Trade comprises an impressive assemblage of the scholarship about Shakespeare's relationship with the book trade and print culture.
Though he cites Joseph Loewenstein's work on possessive authorship, Erne states categorically that a lack of authorial copyright meant that 'dramatists and poets had ultimately no control over the publication of their works' (20), despite Loewenstein's careful demonstration that writers often exerted some form of control over publication.
Erne's conclusions concerning this data are invariably as cautious as they are judicious, and the few times I disagreed with him came mainly from his unwillingness to draw a conclusion that lacked conventional documentary evidence.
Erne's analysis of wage bargaining begins with the downward pressure on wages caused by the introduction of Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) and the subsequent rise of competitive corporatism in the 1990s (including the increasing acceptance of wage concessions by workers).
After working with Erne, visiting Europe, and traveling with Erne to Romania to meet Bora (touted as the "star technical guru," of Erne's past business ventures), the idea for SimplySocial was born.
Lower Lough Erne spans 26 miles and is home to 365 islands.
Arriving back at Lough Erne after a long day, we were greeted like old friends.
After a concise, critical review of editions of Lear from the early modern to the postmodern, Erne notes that in the last twenty-five years "scholarly editors [by virtue of contrasting textual mediations] have produced more than ten radically different Lears and a similar number of Hamlets" (101).
In addition to the documents normally drawn on in such studies, Erne musters several fresh sources of evidence: book patents (p.
In his introduction, Erne takes a fresh look at several issues, including publication of plays, the development of libraries, and Shakespeare's place in early anthologies.