Lubitsch, Ernst

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Related to Ernst Lubitsch: Greta Garbo, Billy Wilder

Lubitsch, Ernst

(lo͞o`bĭch), 1892–1947, German-American film director, b. Berlin. He studied acting in his native city and in 1911 joined Max ReinhardtReinhardt, Max,
1873–1943, Austrian theatrical producer and director, originally named Max Goldmann. After acting under Otto Brahm at the Deutsches Theater in Berlin, he managed (1902–5) his own theater, where he produced more than 50 plays.
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's theatre company. Lubitsch turned to directing in 1914 and became known for such silent films as the drama Madame Du Barry (Passion) and the comedy Die Puppe (The Doll), both released in 1919. Lubitsch made more than 40 German films before he was invited to the United States to direct Mary PickfordPickford, Mary,
1893–1979, American movie actress, b. Toronto, Ont. In 1909 she began working with D. W. Griffith. Specializing in playing young girls, she was dubbed "America's Sweetheart.
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 in Rosita (1923). He became a Hollywood favorite, making Lady Windermere's Fan (1925), The Patriot (1928), and other silents. With the advent of sound, he directed a string of sparkling, sophisticated, and sexually knowing comedies marked by a lightness, urbanity, and grace that critics dubbed "the Lubitsch touch." These include Trouble in Paradise (1932), Design for Living (1933), Ninotchka (1939), The Shop around the Corner (1940), To Be or Not to Be (1942), and Heaven Can Wait (1943). Lubitsch died while filming That Lady in Ermine (1948).

Lubitsch, Ernst

(1892–1947) movie director; born in Berlin, Germany. He began directing movies in Germany in 1914, and was brought to Hollywood by Mary Pickford. A specialist in sophisticated comedies and costume epics, his films include Ninotchka (1939) and Heaven Can Wait (1943).
References in periodicals archive ?
One Hour With You," a 1932 American film produced and directed by Ernst Lubitsch
ERNST Lubitsch makes light of Europe's dark hours as Polish theatrical troupe is involved in espionage and impersonation in Nazi-occupied Warsaw.
That this escape always has been an alternative to life's suffering is underscored by Ernst Lubitsch entitling a pioneering black comedy with William Shakespeare's celebrated wording for suicide, "To Be or Not to Be" (1942).
World War II yielded numerous patriotic calls and depiction of selfless acts in films, but Hitler came in for his share of mockery, from the zaniness of Looney Tunes and Bugs Bunny to the sophistication of directors like Ernst Lubitsch.
To Be or Not to Be (1942): More than a half-century before ``Life Is Beautiful,'' the great Ernst Lubitsch walked the line between horror and laughter in this complex comedy/thriller/melodrama that riled audiences who thought the German-born Lubitsch had somehow misplaced his sympathies.
The film crashes and burns like so many other failed romantic comedies, movies that try to imitate the breezy charm of Ernst Lubitsch or Billy Wilder without the slightest clue of how to approximate the droll sophistication and charm of those masters.
It didn't take that long if the marvelously fluid and sophisticated musicals made by Ernst Lubitsch (``The Love Parade,'' ``Monte Carlo'') and Rouben Mamoulian (``Love Me Tonight'') soon after are any indication.
Right up there with Welles in the no-directing-Oscar pantheon are Alfred Hitchcock (whose ``Rebecca'' won best picture in 1940, and who accepted an honorary statuette decades later with a curt ``Thank you''); artists of silent film slapstick Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton; elegant masters of early sound comedy Ernst Lubitsch, Howard Hawks and Preston Sturges; the wittiest director of movie musicals, Stanley Donen; ``Rebel Without a Cause's'' Nicholas Ray; and irrepressible Hollywood rebels Stanley Kubrick, Robert Altman and John Cassavetes.
One stylistic guideline Mansouri gave Garner was to watch the films of Ernst Lubitsch, a 1930s director who worked with Greta Garbo and other stars of that era.
But it's true, and you can see many of the very best by the incomparable Ernst Lubitsch at UCLA's Melnitz Hall this weekend.
Talents from the urbanely insinuating director Ernst Lubitsch to more explicit acts like Mae West and the Marx Brothers quickly took advantage.