Lubitsch, Ernst

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Related to Ernst Lubitsch: Greta Garbo, Billy Wilder

Lubitsch, Ernst

(lo͞o`bĭch), 1892–1947, German-American film director, b. Berlin. He studied acting in his native city and in 1911 joined Max ReinhardtReinhardt, Max,
1873–1943, Austrian theatrical producer and director, originally named Max Goldmann. After acting under Otto Brahm at the Deutsches Theater in Berlin, he managed (1902–5) his own theater, where he produced more than 50 plays.
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's theatre company. Lubitsch turned to directing in 1914 and became known for such silent films as the drama Madame Du Barry (Passion) and the comedy Die Puppe (The Doll), both released in 1919. Lubitsch made more than 40 German films before he was invited to the United States to direct Mary PickfordPickford, Mary,
1893–1979, American movie actress, b. Toronto, Ont. In 1909 she began working with D. W. Griffith. Specializing in playing young girls, she was dubbed "America's Sweetheart.
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 in Rosita (1923). He became a Hollywood favorite, making Lady Windermere's Fan (1925), The Patriot (1928), and other silents. With the advent of sound, he directed a string of sparkling, sophisticated, and sexually knowing comedies marked by a lightness, urbanity, and grace that critics dubbed "the Lubitsch touch." These include Trouble in Paradise (1932), Design for Living (1933), Ninotchka (1939), The Shop around the Corner (1940), To Be or Not to Be (1942), and Heaven Can Wait (1943). Lubitsch died while filming That Lady in Ermine (1948).
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Lubitsch, Ernst

(1892–1947) movie director; born in Berlin, Germany. He began directing movies in Germany in 1914, and was brought to Hollywood by Mary Pickford. A specialist in sophisticated comedies and costume epics, his films include Ninotchka (1939) and Heaven Can Wait (1943).
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.
References in periodicals archive ?
Die Regie von Ernst Lubitsch vervoll-standigte noch die kunstlerische Wirkung des Ganzen und so konnte der grobe Erfolg auch nicht ausbleiben.
- "One Hour With You," 1932 American film produced and directed by Ernst Lubitsch
She tells me director Ernst Lubitsch (a German-born Jew) directed an anti-Nazi film (the 1942 comedy To Be Or Not To Be starring Jack Benny and Carole Lombard).
To Be Or Not To Be (Ernst Lubitsch, 1942) is discussed here, along with In the Bleak Midwinter/A Midwinter's Tale (Branagh, 1995), and Looking for Richard (Al Pacino, 1996), among others.
In a picture with the breezy sophistication, the elegant atmosphere and the melancholy undercurrent of an Ernst Lubitsch comedy, Julia cuts down on her performing so that she can experience life again, and she ultimately chooses life over theatre.
In the midst of this formulaic decoupage, the director might--under the aegis of Ernst Lubitsch, then America's most celebrated director--insert a telling close-up of an object to underscore the dramatic flow.
To shift from the political to the sexual, compared to today's graphic eroticism Ernst Lubitsch's elegant innuendoes have the bracing effect of a champagne mouthwash.
Given Ernst Lubitsch's contribution to cinema, the amount of critical writing on his work has been disproportionately low.
In director Ernst Lubitsch's hands, it was the story of two Budapest shop clerks living in furnished rooms, workplace rivals who unwittingly become anonymous pen pals and slowly discover that they're soulmates.
You can learn how romantic comedy has gone downhill by going to your video store and renting "Shop Around the Corner" (1940), the Ernst Lubitsch film on which "You've Got Mail" is based.
What I do remember is that when I last visited Tinseltown to receive one of those "lifetime awards" from my fellow documentarians in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, I found myself scared to death, standing on a podium, surrounded by giant golden Oscars, quite spontaneously denouncing the company town I grew up in and the industry that once produced the likes of Frank Capra, Ernst Lubitsch and John Ford.
Continue reading "Ernst Lubitsch's 'To Be or Not To Be,' Hollywood's Other Great Anti-Nazi Movie" at...