eroticism

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eroticism

sexual excitement or desire, and the changing social constructions of this. Theorists such as Michel FOUCAULT, The History ofSexuality (1979) have done much to document how SEXUALITY, the erotic realm and the discourses of eroticism (both scientific and literary) are transformed in every historical period and also have political dimensions (see also ROMANTIC LOVE). At a more empirical level, researchers such as Alfred Kinsey et al. (1948 and 1953) have sought to provide a comprehensive account of the range of erotic sexual behaviour. It is plain that eroticism and the objects of eroticism, which may or may not involve direct behaviour with other persons, take many forms, only a minority of these directly involving sexual reproduction. Most forms, and the greatest incidence of sexual behaviour, can be described as ‘recreational’, much of this as part of a continuing sexual relationship, although varying between different cultures and in different periods in the life cycle.

Eroticism

Aphrodite
novel of Alexandrian manners by Pierre Louys. [Fr. Lit.: Benét, 783]
Ars Amatoria
Ovid’s treatise on lovemaking. [Rom. Lit.: Magill IV, 45]
Barbarella
frequently semi-nude heroine of sexy French comicstrip. [Comics: Berger, 211]
Daphnis and Chloë
their idyll reconciles naïveté and sexual fulfillment. [Gk. Lit.: Magill I, 184]
Delta of Venus
stories of sexual adventure including incest, perversion, prostitution, etc. [Am. Lit.: Anaïs Nin Delta of Venus in Weiss, 124]
Hill, Fanny
narrator of Cleland’s 18th-century novel of erotic experiences. [Br. Lit.: Cleland Memoirs of Fanny Hill]
Kama-Sutra
detailed Hindu account of the art of lovemaking. [Ind. Lit.: Benét, 538]
O
a beautiful woman willing to undergo every form of sexual manipulation at the bidding of her lover. [Fr. Lit.: Pauline Reage The Story of 0 in Weiss, 445]
Perfumed Garden, The
Arabian manual of sexual activity. [Arab. Lit.: EB (1963) IV, 448]
Playboy
monthly magazine renowned for nude photographs. [Am. Pop. Cult.: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Bourgeault, an Episcopal priest, wrote this work to tell the unconventional love story of her powerful bond with Brother Rafael Robin, a Catholic monk, with whom she claims to have shared a mystical, erotic love that has continued to grow and challenge them both even after his death.
She has put in verse all its possible aspects: an undefined longing (Las estrellas vencidas, 1964); erotic love (Eros, 1981), idealized Neoplatonic adoration (Kampa, 1986), and the affirmation of natural right based on ancient rites (Creciente fertil, 1989).
Three examine The Merchant of Venice, in terms of gender, culture, and race, modern and student adaptations, and others discuss the civic drama annually presented for the new mayor of London, marriage ballads in Much Ado About Nothing, the ways that women in nineteenth-century America used Shakespeare, erotic love in the early comedies, family love, the theme of gift giving in A Midsummer Night's Dream, unity in Twelfth Night, and staging.
Sensuous Dervla Kirwan, who played barmaid Assumpta Fitzgerald, has been cast for a major film role as a woman stuck in an erotic love triangle.
4) Similarly, historians who have analyzed the rhetoric of the passions and interests in contemporary debates about obligation have focused on self-interest, greed, or acquisitiveness rather than on erotic love.
Erotic love, however, is not a lesser part in many of the poems' message.
Until the late 19th century, says Scruton (philosophy, Institute for the Psychological Sciences, Virginia) sexual desire was subsumed as a generally unmentioned aspect of erotic love, and since then it has been considered an animal aspect of humans, and so relegated to biology.
Its tip smashed but long since repaired, the monument has reasserted its potency in the here and now, a phallic memorial to erotic love throughout the history of mankind.
As Linnell Secomb argues, for Levinas, erotic love involves "a transcending of self in reaching toward the other and caring for the other (otherwise it would revert to sexual desire)but also a fulfillment of pleasures, creating a form of immanence through the satisfaction of desire" (63).
Emilia's song and Pampinea's hymn to erotic love bookend Day Two, according to Francesco Ciabattoni.
Under the tyranny of erotic love," Socrates explains, the tyrant "has permanently become while awake what he used to become occasionally while asleep.
The last two chapters provide a commentary on the development of erotic love in the films of Hitchcock, Lang, Luis Bunuel, Truffant, Sternberg, Rohmer, Sofia Coppola and many others.