erotophobia

(redirected from Erotophobic)
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erotophobia

[ə‚räd·ə′fō·bē·ə]
(psychology)
An abnormal fear of love.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our analysis, a higher total SOS score represents erotophilic attitudes and lower total scores represent erotophobic attitudes.
As mentioned in the introduction, our previous experiment revealed a rather significant negative correlation with the SAS as a bivariate predictor of Fisher, Byrne, White, and Kelley's (1988) Sexual Opinion Survey, with erotophobic (sexually conservative) people scoring higher on the SAS than erotophilic (sexually liberal) individuals, r(54) = -.
For many it may not matter if they are erotophilic or erotophobic, but being labelled as either type can say a lot about your sexual state and your sex life.
Fisher, Byrne, White, and Kelley (1988) have suggested that erotophobic people are usually uncomfortable with the idea of discussing contraception before engaging in sexual activities.
The erotophobic priest not only intrusively disrupts the traditional Sicilian family structure; he also launches an invective of theological blackmail against the miners in his attempts to extort alms.
Other research (Yarber & Lee, 1983) indicates that erotophobic and high sex-guilt students have more negative attitudes related to homosexuality.
In the contradictory messages of a society that markets rape imagery and at the same time warns you "your cylinder will drop like a bunch of bananas," the parallels with our own erotophobic and misogynist society are vivid.
These writers seem to agree that despite AIDS and recent sexist, homophobic and erotophobic political backlashes, lesbians may be enjoying more sexual freedom than ever before.
Some adolescents are erotophilic (having mostly positive feelings about sexuality), some are erotophobic (having mostly negative feelings about sexuality), and some fail in between.
In general, men tend to report higher levels of erotophilia than women although relatively erotophobic or erotophilic women and men generally respond to sexual content in a similar manner (Rye et al.
001, the sample appeared neither extremely erotophilic nor extremely erotophobic overall.