Error of Measurement


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Error of Measurement

 

the deviation of a measurement result from the true value of the quantity being measured. A distinction is made between systematic errors, random errors, and blunders (also called gross errors, or mistakes).

Systematic errors result chiefly from measuring-device errors and the imperfection of measurement techniques. Random errors are due to a number of uncontrolled circumstances, for example, small variations in the conditions of measurement. The causes of blunders include disrepair of measuring devices, misreading of instruments, and drastic changes in the conditions of measurement. Blunders are usually disregarded when results are processed. The effect of systematic errors can be reduced by introducing corrections or by multiplying the instrument readings by correction factors. Estimates of random errors are obtained by the methods of mathematical statistics.

References in periodicals archive ?
Getting more from the literature: estimating the standard error of measurement from reliability studies.
error of measurement (if the individual made sporadic real changes off
In general, standard error of measurements was small for both measurement techniques.
For purposes of the preceding discussion of the role of standard error of measurement, and other factors affecting the interpretation of IQ scores, we have assumed that "significantly subaverage intellectual functioning" is operationalized as scoring 70 or below on a specific IQ test.
The aim of the study is to apply the typical error of measurement of the BIA method accuracy to estimate the body composition of soccer players.
(1992) Technical error of measurement: a methodological critique.
Curriculum-based measurement of oral reading fluency: The standard error of measurement. School Psychology Review, (36), 130-146.
Formulas for estimating the standard error of measurement (SEM) from the reliability coefficient generally assume that the variability of errors is constant across score levels.
Other topics include (for example) the standard error of measurement, the development and use of selected-response items, and the basis for assigning grades.
There is some error of measurement as well, perhaps because the camera did not zoom and focus exactly the same way twice, or due to the difficulty of estimating the size of the Moon's image.
The revised inventory had a mean of 137.36, a standard deviation of 28.93 and a standard error of measurement of 5.28.