Error of Measurement


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Error of Measurement

 

the deviation of a measurement result from the true value of the quantity being measured. A distinction is made between systematic errors, random errors, and blunders (also called gross errors, or mistakes).

Systematic errors result chiefly from measuring-device errors and the imperfection of measurement techniques. Random errors are due to a number of uncontrolled circumstances, for example, small variations in the conditions of measurement. The causes of blunders include disrepair of measuring devices, misreading of instruments, and drastic changes in the conditions of measurement. Blunders are usually disregarded when results are processed. The effect of systematic errors can be reduced by introducing corrections or by multiplying the instrument readings by correction factors. Estimates of random errors are obtained by the methods of mathematical statistics.

References in periodicals archive ?
1] = Intraclass Correlation Coefficient; SEM = Standard Error of Measurement; SEM (%) = Standard Error of Measurement as a Percent of the Grand Mean; MD = Minimal Difference; MD (%) = Minimal Difference as a Percent of the Grand Mean Table 3.
cos]--cosine error of measurement (supposed to be 0)
This is generally recognised as a superior method: very quick and precise measurements, significantly lower sensitivity to environmental temperature, very low error of measurement (+/- 2[degree]C) and a large measurement range of-110 to + 20 [degrees]C are real advantages over alternative sensor systems.
Experiences on measurement of average diameter of fibres by such technique have shown that owing to specified above a lack the relative error of measurement reached 30 percent.