Erwinia


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Erwinia

[ər′win·ē·ə]
(microbiology)
A genus of motile, rod-shaped bacteria in the family Enterobacteriaceae; these organisms invade living plant tissues and cause dry necroses, galls, wilts, and soft rots.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
[7.] McGuire RG and A Kelman Reduced severity of Erwinia soft rot in potato tubers with increased calcium content.
All of the homologous genes of fragment R4' were found in eight bacterial chromosomes or plasmids, including the chromosomes of Pantoea vagans C9-1 (CP002206.1), Pantoea ananatis PA13 (CP003085.1), Pantoea ananatis LMG 5342 (HE617160.1), and Pantoea ananatis AJ13355 (AP012032.2) as well as plasmid unnamed1 from Pantoea agglomerans FDAARGOS_160 (CP014126.1), plasmid pEB102 from Erwinia billingiae Eb661 (FP236826.1), plasmid pEM65 from Erwinia amylovora (JQ292796.1), and plasmid EaACW_pEI70 from Erwinia amylovora CW56400 (CP002951.1) (Table 2 and Figure 3(a)).
The most abundant genera in this part were Bacillus, followed by Lysinibacillus, Enterobacter, Brevibacteruim, Pseudomonas, and Erwinia. Fruit samples contained 3, 3, and 2 genera in winter, summer, and autumn, respectively and the predominant genus was Bacillus, followed by Enterobacter, Pseudomonas and Masillia.
(1999) detected Erwinia amylovora contamination in 62, 42 and 51 out of 251 samples by nested-PCR in a single tube, standard one-round PCR and two-tube nested-PCR, respectively.
TABLE 2--Area under the disease progress curve (AUDCP) of the bacterial blight (Erwinia psidii) in the guava tree different phenological stages, in different kinds of cultural management, under different production systems.
Large number of microorganisms that include Erwinia carotovora [3], Pseudomonas stutzeri [4], Pseudomonas aerugenosa [5] and E.
Some additional results of the study, the significance of which might be less obvious to most winemakers, include the abundant presence of the bacterial genus Erwinia and other members of the same Enterorbacteriaceae family, regardless of sulfite levels.
Comparisons between SSc patients and controls demonstrated numerous differences in the microbial communities in both the cecum (R2 = 0.9; P = .001) and sigmoid (R2 = 0.9; P = .002), including a much higher abundance of the species Erwinia and Trabulsiella in patients with the most severe symptoms.
There are eight chapters: functional diversification of phytopathogenic type III secreted effector proteins; systems biology of Pseudomonas synringae type III secretion effector repertoires; towards understanding fire blight: virulence mechanisms and their regulation in Erwinia amylovora; plant-pathogenic Acidovorax species; the interactions between gram-positive pathogens and plant hosts; the molecular interactions between human-pathogenic bacteria and plants; recent advances in Pseudomonas biocontrol; the potential role of bacteriophages in shaping plant-bacteria interactions.