Erysichthon


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Erysichthon

condemned by Demeter to perpetual insatiety. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 93]
See: Hunger
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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One of these adapts, with some modification, Metamorphoses 8's tale of Erysichthon and Mestra.
In the Metamorphoses, the imprudent actions of Mestra's father Erysichthon, a flouter of divine authority, prompt her shape-shifting career.
"Ecocriticism and Myth: The Case of Erysichthon." ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment 15.2 (2008): 103-16.
Classical Greek mythology takes you into the company of the likes of Erysichthon, a King so hungry that he resorts to dining on himself; blood-suckers roam wild in the Caribbean and Southern States; while our own urban legends are (salt and) peppered with jocular axe wielders seeking out the jugulars of young lovers.
In her central long poem "Immortal Even More" she investigates the story of Erysichthon and his daughter.
Other narrators provide critical commentary to increase our moral understanding of the play: referring to an avaricious, self-centered individual, Erysichthon, the storyteller notes, "The emptiness within him was unappeasable.
(13.) A similar violation is presented in the myth of Erysichthon, who after cutting down a grove consecrated to Demeter, was condemned by the goddess to suffer eternal hunger no matter how much he ate.
"Ugolino and Erysichthon." Dante and Ovid: Essays in Intertextuality.
29 To a limited extent her situation recalls the punishment of Erysichthon, whose sin against Demeter resulted in his inability to satisfy his hunger, as told by Callimachus in the Hymn to Demeter.
The earliest Athenian kings tended to have similar names, suggesting a connection with the earth (chtho^On; e.g., Erichthonius, Erysichthon), to have been born of the earth and raised by Athena, and to have something serpentine about them.
Only, in the present instance, like the wilful and shrinking Erysichthon of Greek myth, Germany is acting out upon herself, and that can really be quite painful.
In her central long poem, "Immortal Even More," she investigates the story of Erysichthon and his daughter.