Erythema Infectiosum


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

Erythema Infectiosum

 

(also fifth disease), an infectious disease primarily of children between the ages of five and 12, characterized by an erythematous rash. The causative agent, which is unknown, presumably enters the body in droplets suspended in the air. The incubation period is one to two weeks. Red, raised, confluent spots appear on the cheeks. Eruptions then appear on the trunk and extensor surfaces of the limbs, where they coalesce to form indistinct erythema patches. They gradually disappear, leaving behind marmoreal markings after six to ten days. The patient’s general condition usually remains good.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The current study represents a further contribution to the molecular characterization of B19V in Brazil since it presents an analysis of the genotypes circulating during two distinct outbreaks of erythema infectiosum in our country.
Pregnant women are advised to avoid those with a known case of erythema infectiosum because of the potential for complications, such as intrauterine death (Hay, Levin, Sondheimer, & Deterding, 2011).
In the present study, one B19 IgM positive patient developed features of erythema infectiosum in the form of atypical maculo-papular rashes on both the lower limbs which has seldom been reported (23,24).
The most common clinical presentations of infection are fifth disease or erythema infectiosum, arthropathy and hydrops fetalis, which are found among immunocompetent hosts (2), (3), (38).
[1.] Erythema infectiosum fifth disease) is characterized by several days of high fever, migratory myalgias and arthralgias, lymphadenopathy, anemia, and the presence of a maculopapular rash that appears as the fever breaks.
The common name for erythema infectiosum came from its fifth position on a list developed in the early 1900s of childhood rash diseasaes.
The symptoms vary from a minor illness, possibly with headache, mild fever and sore throat, to erythema infectiosum, which produces a rash on the cheeks - hence its name 'slapped cheek'.
The common exanthems were numbered in the early 1900s and include in numerical order: rubeola, scarlet fever, Filatov-Dukes disease (now considered to be several viral diseases rather than a single entity), rubella, erythema infectiosum (fifth disease), and roseola (sometimes called exanthem subitum or sixth disease) (Adams & Ware, 1996).