erythema

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erythema

(ĕr'əthē`mə), more or less diffuse redness of the skin due to concentration of an abnormally large amount of blood within the small vessels of the skin (hyperemia), as in burns. Erythema nodosum is often associated with systemic diseases such as tuberculosis and rheumatic fever. Tender, bright red, slightly elevated nodules develop along the shins. Erythema multiforme can have a number of causes, including viral and bacterial infection, chronic disease of the visceral organs, or allergic reactions to drugs.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Erythema

 

reddening of the skin caused by the dilatation of blood vessels. Erythema sometimes occurs by reflex action and disappears quickly, for example, when one feels ashamed or angry. With inflammation, the condition lasts longer. It appears as a result of exposure to chemicals and physical factors (friction, heat, cold, ultraviolet radiation) and in some infectious diseases (scarlet fever, measles, erythema infectiosum) and skin diseases (dermatitis). It also occurs as a result of poisoning and disturbances in blood circulation.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

erythema

[‚er·ə′thē·mə]
(medicine)
Localized redness of the skin in areas of variable size.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
where [E.sub.0]([theta], [OMEGA], T) is the erythemal irradiance at sea level from a radiative transfer calculation (Herman 2010).
The clear-sky erythemal irradiances presented above are limiting cases; the actual radiation levels encountered at any location depend on the characteristics of haze and cloudiness, and these can vary substantially from one geographic location to another and with time.
The reconstruction of erythemal UV doses for the Toravere site was performed earlier for the years 1955-2004 by Eerme and co-workers (Eerme et al., 2002, 2006) based on statistical relationships between the measured erythemal UV doses and proxy data.
states based on cutaneous melanoma in response to atmospheric UV levels; 2) to determine the fraction (UVA, UVB, erythemal UV [UVery], or UV vitamin D [UV-VitD]) that was better associated with cutaneous melanoma; and 3) to analyze the spatial trends of the indicator.
Later research showed that, while days with thick clouds were associated with an 80 percent decrease in erythemal UVR, moderately cloudy days gave evidence of greater UVR than days with clear skies (Bais et al., 1993).
The Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service (TEMIS) archived daily datasets of UV erythemal (UVE) dose rate and UV-index (UV-I) are used in this study.
UV B is further divided into erythemal (280-300 nm) and nonerythemal (300-315 nm) wavelengths.
Relative spectral response (Dichter et al, 1993) of the instrument is close to Erythemal action spectrum (McKinley and Diffey, 1987).
Parisi, "Measurements of the anatomical distribution of erythemal ultraviolet: a study comparing exposure distribution to the site incidence of solar keratoses, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma," Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences, vol.
It is therefore worth emphasizing that the low (20 Percent reducing to 10 Percent) incremental dose regimen was adjusted to take into consideration each individual patients' erythemal response.
However, UVA levels in SA are not thought to typically exceed 7 minimal erythemal doses (MEDs) a day.
Photobiological investigation may reveal a decreased Minimal Erythemal Dose (MED) to UVB, but often also to UVA and visible light, as well as a decreased Minimal Edematous Dose (MEdD) (3), (4).