erythema

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erythema

(ĕr'əthē`mə), more or less diffuse redness of the skin due to concentration of an abnormally large amount of blood within the small vessels of the skin (hyperemia), as in burns. Erythema nodosum is often associated with systemic diseases such as tuberculosis and rheumatic fever. Tender, bright red, slightly elevated nodules develop along the shins. Erythema multiforme can have a number of causes, including viral and bacterial infection, chronic disease of the visceral organs, or allergic reactions to drugs.

Erythema

 

reddening of the skin caused by the dilatation of blood vessels. Erythema sometimes occurs by reflex action and disappears quickly, for example, when one feels ashamed or angry. With inflammation, the condition lasts longer. It appears as a result of exposure to chemicals and physical factors (friction, heat, cold, ultraviolet radiation) and in some infectious diseases (scarlet fever, measles, erythema infectiosum) and skin diseases (dermatitis). It also occurs as a result of poisoning and disturbances in blood circulation.

erythema

[‚er·ə′thē·mə]
(medicine)
Localized redness of the skin in areas of variable size.
References in periodicals archive ?
Climatology of UV-A, UV-B, and erythemal radiation at the earth's surface, 1979-2000 (Technical Note #NCAR/TN-474).
The relationship between erythemal UV and ozone derived from spectral irradiance measurements.
The minimum erythema dose (MED) is the minimum input of UVR necessary to produce an erythemal reaction per square unit of surface area of skin after 24 hours of exposure.
Usage of the polyphenylene oxide dosimeter to measure annual solar erythemal exposures,' Photochemistry and Photobiology, vol.
The South African Weather Service monitors ambient solar erythemal UV-B radiation (290-320 nm) levels at six stations in South Africa: Pretoria (25.
Most of the erythemal annual UV dose is encountered under nonvacation conditions, when no sunscreen is applied.
Eight white skinned subjects were then whole body irradiated with one personal minimum erythemal dose from sun lamps.
The relationship between chronological age and the erythemal response to ultraviolet B radiation.
The first study set out to determine the cutaneous effects of minimal erythemal amounts of solar-simulated UV radiation, as well as minimal suberythemal doses of UVA.
The relationship between erythemal UV and ozone, derived from spectral irradiance measurements.