Esau and Jacob


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Esau and Jacob

after many years, they are reconciled. [O.T.: Genesis 33:1–4]
See: Reunion

Esau and Jacob

struggled even in mother’s womb. [O.T.: Genesis 25:22]
See: Rivalry
References in classic literature ?
The sperm whale, as with all other species of the Leviathan, but unlike most other fish, breeds indifferently at all seasons; after a gestation which may probably be set down at nine months, producing but one at a time; though in some few known instances giving birth to an Esau and Jacob: -- a contingency provided for in suckling by two teats, curiously situated, one on each side of the anus; but the breasts themselves extend upwards from that.
The one clear lesson from the story of Esau and Jacob is that they were never able to get along and work together for a greater good.
Esau and Jacob enter into a kind of purchase agreement because they both wish to; it is their own free will.
Timberlake carefully details the birth of twins Esau and Jacob, their natural inclinations, personalities, and their interaction with parents, Isaac, and Rebecca.
Indeed, to go back further still to the story of the birth of the two boys, Esau and Jacob, Rebekah learns from the mouth of God that "two nations are in your womb ...
Isaac has only two children, Esau and Jacob. In principle, the blessing would go to the first-born son, Esau.
In the conclusion, Kessler warns that a focus on the contrast between Esau and Jacob obscures the importance, in itself, of Genesis Rabba's construction of the fetus Jacob as good rabbinic Jew.
The presentation of Esau and Jacob in Genesis 25 illustrates this quality.
For admittedly, we are all Esau and Jacob, and at one time or another one will dominate, the other serve, and this is something Isaac recognized and understood.
Does diselection mean the same thing for reconciled brothers (Esau and Jacob) as for unreconciled half-brothers (Isaac and Ishmael), as for uncle and nephew (Abraham and Lot)?
Invented by two Jewish boys during the depression, Superman and Clark Kent (Esau and Jacob?) are one man.
On the one hand it's hard to fault this sort of storytelling as unbiblical, given that both Hebrew and Christian scripture are rife with tales of fraternal conflict: Cain and Abel, Esau and Jacob, Joseph and his brothers, not to mention the prodigal son and his righteous older sibling.