Eski-Kermen

Eski-Kermen

 

remains of a medieval cave city that existed from the early sixth century until 1229 in the Crimea, 18 km southwest of Bakhchisarai. N. I. Repnikov conducted excavations at Eski-Kermen from 1928 to 1937. The city was an important fortress on the approaches to the Byzantine Chersonesus Táurica. The aboveground part was surrounded by a powerful wall. A Christian basilica was built in the sixth century. In the late eighth century, Eski-Kermen was destroyed, probably by the Khazars. Reconstruction was undertaken in the 11th century. In the 12th century, Eski-Kermen became part of the Theodoro principality. It was destroyed in 1229 by Khan Nogai’s hordes.

REFERENCE

Iakobson, A. L. Srednevekovyi Krym. Moscow-Leningrad, 1964.
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AD 550-1550, saintly associations with caves in Ireland from the early medieval period (AD 400-1169) to recent times, Christian and Muslim patterns of secular and religious cave use in the Iberian Peninsula during Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages: fifth/sixth to 11th-12th centuries, knights in the dark: on the function of Polish caves in the middle ages, and the triconchial medieval cave churches of Eski-Kermen (Crimea): recent results of investigations.