Esophagoscopy


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

esophagoscopy

[e‚säf·ə′gäs·kə·pē]
(medicine)
Endoscopic examination of the interior of the esophagus.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Esophagoscopy

 

examination of the inner surface of the esophagus with a special instrument, esophagoscope, which is equipped with an optical system. The esophagoscope is introduced through the mouth under local or general anesthesia. Esophagoscopy is used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It is helpful in detecting tumors and other diseases of the esophagus, as well as the cicatricial narrowing of the esophageal lumen. Esophagoscopy is also used in taking a biopsy, performing bougienage, and locating and removing a foreign body. The once widely used rigid steel esophagoscopes were replaced in the 1970’s by flexible and less traumatic fiberscopes.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Level of Oesophageal Stricture According to Esophagoscopy Sl.
Koufman, "Transnasal Esophagoscopy" Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, vol.
The detected FBs included food (52%) and pins (19%).9 In our case, multiple FBs were removed by esophagoscopy, but the body of a wristwatch could not be extracted with this method and required surgery.
Barium swallow and esophagoscopy are used as primary investigations for dysphagia, and they can demonstrate esophageal narrowing and sometimes fistula between the cyst and the esophagus.
"Esophagoscopy is the best way to diagnose esophagitis secondary to the acid reflux condition," Dr.
A total of 57 patients were included in the study presenting with foreign body ingestion that underwent esophagoscopy under general anesthesia.
Eleven patients (78.58% of cases) had a foreign body removed with a gripper; whereas, in three patients, that is 21.34% of cases, there was a spontaneous bolus propulsion towards the oesophagus during esophagoscopy.
Routine radiological examinations and esophagoscopy were performed when necessary.
Gavage feeding, wound debridement, and esophagoscopy were planned for the next day but the bird died overnight.