essential amino acid

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essential amino acid

[i′sen·chəl ə′mē·nō ‚as·əd]
(biochemistry)
Any of eight of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids that are indispensable for optimum animal growth but cannot be formed in the body and must be supplied in the diet.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dietary proteins provide a source of the naturally occurring twenty amino acids, most importantly the nine essential amino acids.
Multiple sources of protein promote protein synthesis after exercise, but only those with essential amino acids elevate synthesis.
In fact, the rumen microbes can make essential amino acids from nitrogen sources that are not even in protein form.
For those with PKU, the body is unable to produce an enzyme in the liver needed to convert the amino acid, phenylalanine into another essential amino acid, tyrosine.
Not only did Buchnera keep the genes for essential amino acids, but it added extra copies of those genes, earlier studies found.
Relation between plasma amino acid levels and the diagnosis of protein energy malnutrition (PEM) Median (and percentiles) by group Amino acid level Control PEM ([micro]mol/l) Essential amino acids Isoleucine 61 (41-94) 50 (34-82) Leucine 118.
In our previous studies, requirements for dietary essential amino acids such as arginine, methionine, lysine and valine were obtained in rainbow trout using PFAA in surgically modified rainbow trout (Bae et al.
It was found that the samples were good sources of high quality protein of almost adequate or more than adequate of essential amino acids, low Leu/Ile ratio and high protein efficiency ratio values thereby providing a probable premium quality meat.
The trend for the non-essential amino acids is similar to that recorded for the essential amino acids (Table 3).
Evaluation of methods to estimate the essential amino acids requirements of fish from the muscle amino acid profile
Muscle protein kinetics and mixed muscle fractional synthetic rate (FSR) were calculated before and after the bolus ingestion of 15 g of essential amino acids (EAA) in young (n = 6) and elderly (n = 7) subjects.
These essential amino acids must therefore be obtained from the diet.