essential fatty acid

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essential fatty acid

[i′sen·chəl ′fad·ē ‚as·əd]
(biochemistry)
Any of the polyunsaturated fatty acids which are required in the diet of mammals; they are probably precursors of prostaglandins.
References in periodicals archive ?
As we age, essential fatty acids are depleted due to UV exposure, (35) dry air, and harsh soaps, (36,37) making their replenishment vital for preserving healthy, youthful skin.
The correction of dietary imbalances (with respect to zinc and essential fatty acids in particular) is necessary factor in good dermatological therapy.
GLA also corrects the balance of essential fatty acids in the body and enhances their effects.
And it's rich in enzymes, phytonutrients, and 4g of omega-3 and essential fatty acids. Flavors are Chocolate Decadence, Green Synergy, and Wholesome Original.
Baby food guru and bestselling author Annabel Karmel said: "What is not commonly known is that there are two nutrients lacking in many children's diet - iron and essential fatty acids.
Essential fatty acids, usually found in fish oils, cannot be made in the body but are needed to support the nervous, cardiovascular and immune systems.
Essential fatty acids are necessary fats that humans cannot synthesize, and must be obtained through diet.
However, the differences in health benefits between ALA and the long-chain essential fatty acids are sometimes overlooked.
Both classes comprise several fatty acids, including two essential fatty acids that must be supplied by the diet.
Because the body does not produce its own essential fatty acids, the authors state that target EPA and DHA consumption should be at least 500mg/day for individuals without underlying overt cardiovascular disease, and at least 800 to 1000mg/day for those with known coronary heart disease and heart failure.
Omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is one of the essential fatty acids, which is not synthesised by the human body and must be consumed through food.
Topics include diet and oxidative stress in schizophrenia, oxidative stress and its relation to antipsychotic agents, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, membrane fatty acid deficits in schizophrenia and mood disorders, essential fatty acids and developmental disorders, therapeutic prospects (including those for childhood developmental disorders, fatty acid supplementation for schizophrenia and mood disorders, bioactive lipids and niacin in schizophrenia), and theoretical and methodological changes to come, including long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and perinatal origins of schizophrenia and uses of integrative biochemical investigation.

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