Established Church


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Related to Established Church: Jonathan Edwards, Bacon's Rebellion

Established Church

a Church that is officially recognized as a national institution, esp the Church of England
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
in Scotland the established church of the majority population was the presbyterian Kirk of Scotland, while the minority faiths included the old Episcopalian Church, which had been ousted in 1689.
"The presence of an established church gives assurance to the British population, the vast majority of whom, according to the 2001 census, believe in God, that the nation and its government take their faith seriously.
At a time, for instance, when the institution of marriage - even now, one of the few sources of social stability left - has never been under greater pressure, most of the bishops of the Established Church have decided that cohabitation without marriage is no longer "living in sin".
In it he rejects the Scriptures and the established church as the source of divinity and instead invokes personal intuition with God.
THE Queen said yesterday that she believes the concept of the established Church is "commonly under-appreciated" and "occasionally misunderstood".
The Church of England is the nation's established church, formally sanctioned and supported by the Queen and the Government.
They opposed programs that taxed people to support one officially established church or 15 churches.
Bryan Blundell was an Anglican, but he told John Brekell, one of the dissenting (Presbyterian) ministers, that the Latin inscription above the main entrance which declared that the school was for the children of the established church only had been forced on him against his will by "some zealous churchmen".
Ironically, saints are sometimes at odds with the established church of their time, he noted.
He never allowed the RC Church to become the established church of Ireland and was very fair to the Protestant minority.
This book examines the situation of evangelical clergy in the Church of England and Ireland between 1800 and 1850 that produced such discontent with the Established Church that many evangelicals, although not a majority, were propelled into outright secession (3).
There is no place for an established Church in a modern democracy.'