Established Church

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Established Church

a Church that is officially recognized as a national institution, esp the Church of England
References in periodicals archive ?
org/establishment-clause) Establishment clause states that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion," which has been used, most notably, to ensure that public institutions like school cannot promote religious practices or beliefs.
The First Amendment states, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.
Second, the Constitution in the First Amendment reads in relevant part: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion.
Awad's lawsuit, based on his own Shariah-compliant will, said SQ 755 violates the First Amendment's Establishment Clause that bars government bodies from making laws "respecting the establishment of religion.
In assessing this point, it is important to note how the establishment of religion functioned historically.
This contrasts with the 'secularism' of the United States constitution, which owes much to the pioneering insight of Roger Williams--founder of Rhode Island--that 'Christ requireth not the establishment of religion in any civil state'.
Another element of the Establishment Clause model set forth in Wrestling with God is that an improper establishment of religion, by the very definition of the word "establishment," requires something more than a transitory or isolated association between government and a particular religious sect.
The Establishment Clause of the First Amendment--"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof"--is the basis for the American concept of the separation of church and state.
When introducing the legal text of the First Amendment, Thomas cites only the Establishment Clause, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion .
I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should 'make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof,' thus building a wall of separation between Church and State.
As it says in the First Amendment: 'Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise of thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of people peaceable to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.
The Public Expression of Religion Act would remove the authority for judges to award taxpayer monies in attorneys fees in Establishment Clause (``Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion.

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