Eteocles and Polynices

Eteocles and Polynices

their hatred extended to the funeral pyre where even their flames would not mingle. [Gk. Myth.: “The Seven Against Thebes” in Bénet, 917]
See: Hatred

Eteocles and Polynices

brothers battle for Theban throne. [Gk. Lit.: Seven Against Thebes]
See: Rivalry
References in periodicals archive ?
The two sons, Eteocles and Polynices, in order to avoid bloodshed, agreed to rule Thebes in alternate years.
Following a choral ode, a messenger enters, announcing that the attackers have been repelled but that Eteocles and Polynices have killed each other in battle.
The idea about the bestial nature of both Eteocles and Polynices, insinuated at various points in the drama (263, 420, 455-56, 699, 1169), will culminate in the Chorus' characterisation of them as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 'twin beasts of prey' (1296)--following their mutual killing.
After Eteocles and Polynices have killed each other in battle, Creon, Antigone's uncle and now king of Thebes, decrees that Eteocles' body shall be buried with honors befitting a national hero but that Polynices' body shall be left unburied, a prey to scavengers.
for consenting to his banishment, his sons, Eteocles and Polynices, agreed to occupy the Theban throne on alternate years.