Ethiopian


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Related to Ethiopian: Ethiopian language

Ethiopian

1. of or denoting a zoogeographical region consisting of Africa south of the Sahara
2. Anthropol obsolete of or belonging to a postulated racial group characterized by dark skin, an oval elongated face, and thin lips, living chiefly in Africa south of the Sahara
3. any of the languages of Ethiopia, esp Amharic
4. an archaic word for Black
References in periodicals archive ?
The prime minister - scheduled to arrive in Ethiopia today to explore new ways of helping Africa - should repatriate rare religious books and manuscripts and hundreds of other Ethiopian treasures, historian Richard Pankhurst said in Addis Ababa.
Gebremariam, like most Ethiopian farmers, is lucky just to make it year to year without starving.
Of particular note is the work of former Howard professor Boghossian, who died at age 66 soon after fire exhibit opened in May and is considered a pioneer of the contemporary Ethiopian art movement.
Churches evolved to suit the Ethiopian Orthodox rituals, and traditionally, except for the rock and the original ancient Aksumite types, were generally circular.
Goewin arrives in Ethiopia after the devastation of her father's death at the hand of his illegitimate son, called Medraut in this story, She discovers that before her half-brother, the heir to Arthur's throne, disappeared he fathered a child with an Ethiopian princess.
Eleven years hence, and despite government policies of affirmative action (such as tuition-wavers for Ethiopian university students, and favourable mortgage terms), the situation of Ethiopian-Jews remains grave.
The (white) heroine Charicleia, raised as a Greek, discovers at seventeen that she is actually the daughter of the (black) Ethiopian King Hydaspes.
However, the Ethiopian church and nation, which alone in Africa south of Egypt had successfully resisted Islam, was seen by successive waves of Catholic and Protestant missionary activity as a church that had to be purified and reunited with the mainstream of Christianity.
From 1966-70 Wudneh was head of the Government Press Department in what was then the Ethiopian province of Eritrea but is now an independent country.
and the Nile Ethiopian Ensemble, unfortunately, did without the full theatrical trimmings but gave inspired performances nonetheless.
Excavations in 1993 and 1994 at Konso-Gardula, another group of Ethiopian sites, produced a 1.
The media told us little of the war between the Ethiopian government and the Eritrean and Tigrean guerrillas in the northern part of the country, even though it was taking place in the middle of the famine zone and was being fought on a larger scale and for a longer period of time than any other war in Africa.

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