Derg

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Derg

 

(Lough Derg), a lake in Ireland in the Shannon River Valley. Area, 129 sq km; depth, up to 24 m; water level, 33 m. The primarily low banks are steep and rocky in the south and southeast. The lake is used as a reservoir for a hydroelectric power station on the Shannon and serves as a link in the waterway from the upper reaches of the river to the Atlantic Ocean. The city of Killaloe lies on the southern end of the lake.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Halliday, Fred, and Maxine Molyneux 1981 The Ethiopian Revolution. London: Verso.
Kapuscinski relates in the book The Emperor, the Ethiopian revolution
Just before the Ethiopian revolution (1974), the first members of the Twelve Tribes were sent to Ethiopia, and the organization redefined itself in relation to the wider landscape of Back-to-Africa initiatives and other Rastafari affiliations.
As a result of the Ethiopian revolution of 1974, Seattle became the landing site of the first mass transfer of black Africans to the United States since the end of slavery, write Scott (emeritus, sociology, U.
What follows is a brief excerpt from my forthcoming book (planned to be a little over 300 pages), "The Ethiopian Revolution and the Generation of the 1970s: Dreams, Memories and Harsh Realities." The two main characters -- Jembernesh and Kurat -- were childhood lovers in the 1970s.
(17) However, American misinterpretation was clear on every level of the Ethiopian revolution, and, in large part, the U.S.
The second edition of Bahru Zewde's A History of Modern Ethiopia provides what the first edition lacked: a chapter on the ignominious fate of the Ethiopian Revolution, its French Revolutionesque vicissitudes, and finally the drawn out collapse of Ethiopia's most autocratic regime, thereby extending the analysis from 1974 through 1991.
In particular, he treats the success of the EPLF largely as an outcome of the 1974 Ethiopian revolution, and especially the political failures of the Mengistu regime, along with support from Eritreans abroad.
But there was one crucial difference between the experience of the Ethiopian left at home and that of its counterpart in North America, namely, while many members of EPRP paid dearly with their lives for theoretical and strategic mistakes made by their short-lived party, ESUNA's theoretical shortcomings, which were not unlike those of EPRP, did not have deadly material consequences for ESUNA militants, the vast majority of whom opted to stay put in North America while the Ethiopian revolution ran its course.
The Ethiopian Revolution of 1974 did not, of course, mean writers could flourish.
The Ethiopian Revolution has a useful chronology of events, and an extensive bibliography, particularly of left wing papers and publications.
Comparing and contrasting the Cambodian and Ethiopian revolutions of the 1970s, Kissi (African history, U.

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