ethnocentrism

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ethnocentrism,

the feeling that one's group has a mode of living, values, and patterns of adaptation that are superior to those of other groups. It is coupled with a generalized contempt for members of other groups. Ethnocentrism may manifest itself in attitudes of superiority or sometimes hostility. Violence, discrimination, proselytizing, and verbal aggressiveness are other means whereby ethnocentrism may be expressed.

ethnocentrism

  1. the attitude of prejudice or mistrust towards outsiders which may exist within a social group; a way of perceiving one's own cultural group (in-group) in relation to others (out-groups). The term was introduced by W. G. SUMNER (1906) and involves the belief that one's own group is the most important, or is culturally superior to other groups. Thus, one's own culture is considered to be racially, morally and culturally of greater value or significance than that of others, and one becomes distrustful of those defined as outsiders. It also involves an incapacity to acknowledge that cultural differentiation does not imply the inferiority of those groups who are ethnically distinct from one's own.
  2. a characteristic of certain personality types. The ethnocentric personality is described by T Adorno et al. (1950) in The Authoritarian Personality (see AUTHORITARIAN PERSONALITY). Initially this study was concerned with the social and psychological aspects of anti-Semitism, but developed into a study of its more general correlates. Adorno et al. were concerned with explaining attitudes towards other ‘out-groups’ in American society, such as homosexuals and ethnic minorities, and maintained that antagonism towards one ‘out-group’ (e.g. Jews) seldom existed in isolation. They found that ethnocentrism tended to be associated with authoritarianism, dogmatism and rigidity, political and economic conservatism, and an implicit anti-democratic ideology. Thus, hostility towards one ‘out-group’ (see IN-GROUP AND OUT-GROUP) was often generalized and projected onto other ‘out-groups’. See also PREJUDICE, DISCRIMINATION, RACISM OR RACIALISM, ATTITUDE, ATTITUDE SCALE.
References in periodicals archive ?
En sus aportaciones en relacion con la cultura nahuatl cabe mencionar "Expanding Ethnocentricism in Allahuac: Gender and Ethnicity in the Nation-Building Process".
Africentricity does not condone ethnocentricism, valorization at the expense of degrading other groups or their perspectives.
Similarly Orwell's writings on Africa reveal the sort of ethnocentricism which Mary Kingsley had battled against in the 1890s.
The theological lesson Mfu draws from the poem's repeated representations of baptism is not the promise of spiritual enlightenment, but the threat of an ethnocentricism that endorses the exercise of power through which "one culture .
Even though museums may aim to be cross-cultural in scope and to challenge ethnocentricism, they are also arenas in which one culture displays another (1990: 64).
75) His response to the charge of ethnocentricism in this case as well thus hinges on the historical and psychological developmental theories he cites, since these are the sole bases of his claim that (U) elucidates a substantive moment of normativity common to all forms of sociocultural life.
Ethnocentrism Ethnocentricism occurs when one cultural group measures the words or behavior of another group against their own cultural standards without attempting to understand.
Black feminists further challenged the earlier feminist movement's universal claim that it represented the interests of all women, and the implicit ethnocentricism and racism of the earlier movement's assumptions (Langan and Day 1992:4).
I consider ethnocentricism comparable to the old nationalism of fifty years ago that dominated Europe between the wars.
The notes of Bre'beuf's private agony are, of course, illustrative of the flagrant ethnocentricism of his day.
Feminist theorists who have made many valuable exposes of sexism in everyday language, seem to often neglect or be unaware of the ethnocentricism of their vocabulary when discussing NESB women.
Such a perception replaces the existing bias of a simple ethnocentricism in favor of the observer's culture with an eclectic relativism.