ethnography

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ethnography:

see anthropologyanthropology,
classification and analysis of humans and their society, descriptively, culturally, historically, and physically. Its unique contribution to studying the bonds of human social relations has been the distinctive concept of culture.
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; ethnologyethnology
, scientific study of the origin and functioning of human cultures. It is usually considered one of the major branches of cultural anthropology, the other two being anthropological archaeology and anthropological linguistics. In the 19th cent.
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ethnography

the direct observation of an organization or small society, and the written description produced. Often the method of observation involves PARTICIPANT OBSERVATION. The ethnographic method (sometimes also referred to as FIELDWORK) is a basic method in SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY, It is also a method used in some areas of sociology, e.g. COMMUNITY STUDIES. Usually a researcher gathers data by living and working in the society or social setting being researched, seeking to immerse himself or herself as fully as possible in the activities under observation, but at the same time keeping careful records of these activities.

In anthropology, an emphasis on the importance of the ethnographic method was initially associated with the functionalist school, which encouraged an analysis of the internal structure and function of single societies rather than historical or comparative studies (see FUNCTIONALISM). However, there is no inherent reason why ethnographic and comparative approaches should not be seen as complementary or why ethnography should simply be associated with one theoretical school.

ethnography

[eth′nä·grə·fē]
(anthropology)
The branch of ethnology that deals with the description of races or ethnic groups, without attempting to analyze or compare them.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, the consideration of the different stages of post-fieldwork processes provides the budding ethnographer with a strategy to follow after the hectic experience of fieldwork.
All the villagers flee in horror as the ethnographers leave the deserted village in deadly silence, taking the Kono with them.
In this book, the author explores constructions of ethnicity and music-culture as a direct corollary of the impact of tourists (long attracted to this mountainous region) and ethnographers (similarly attracted to a rich folk culture) in a study drawn from over ten years of research and fieldwork, and built on a dissertation and several published articles.
When we come to see all ethnography (and all research) as about the researcher, as autobiographical in some sense, readers must recognize themselves as active ethnographers as well, studying, exploring, and describing the culture represented in the printed text.
Like Chalubinski and Kreptowski-Sabala, his position follows the same route already traced by ethnographers and their subjects in search of musical representations of Gorale culture.
It is at this critical juncture that ethnographers began to suspect that there was more to it than either the simple recording of daily experience, often from a distance (the "aristocratic" genre), or even a rich contrast between experience and stereotypes ("worker ethnography").
The author provides teachers, teacher educators, and aspiring critical ethnographers with a glimpse into the complexity of education in a multilingual high school context (the one that Tara Goldstein studied is set in Toronto).
It is beyond the scope of this review--which is essentially a notice of Schroeder's biography of Eylmann--to undertake a comparison of Eylmann's ethnography with the work of other ethnographers of the period.
Noted ethnographers Lois Weis and Michelle Fine, in conversations with fifteen graduate students, offer readers varying perspectives on what lies beneath the surface of qualitative inquiry and what it means to carry out a piece of qualitative work.
And what of the sources and times before legions of United States ethnographers spread out in the new American land empire in the latter part of the nineteenth century?
As McCabe argues in his concluding paragraphs, Elizabethan ethnographers, including Spenser, sensed that contemporary Ireland suspiciously resembled early Britain, and that contact with the Irish might expose the fragility of England's own veneer of civilization.
Based on information gathered through conversations with ethnographers, epidemiologists, law enforcement officials, and treatment providers working throughout the United States, this report presents findings before population--based, long-term research is available.