Eton


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Eton

(ē`tən), town (1991 pop. 3,559), Windsor and Maidenhead, central England, on the Thames River. It is known chiefly for Eton College, largest and most famous of the English public schools, founded with King's College, Cambridge, by King Henry VI in 1440. Some of the buildings (chapel, lower school, cloisters) date back to the 15th cent. Eton is unlike other English public schools in that it does not have a prefect system. At Eton senior students have a larger voice in the selection of student leaders. Another distinctive feature at Eton is the tutorial system, by which each student has a personal tutor. Many of England's most notable men were schooled at Eton. It maintains a close alliance with King's College, Cambridge; scholarships are offered between the institutions. The annual cricket match between Eton and Harrow attracts much attention.

Eton

 

a town in Great Britain in the south of the county of Buckinghamshire, on the left bank of the Thames opposite the city of Windsor. Population, approximately 5, 000 (1970). Eton is famous for the school founded there in 1440, Eton College, which takes most of its students from aristocratic families.

Eton

1. a town in S England, in Windsor and Maidenhead unitary authority, Berkshire, near the River Thames: site of Eton College, a public school for boys founded in 1440. Pop.: 3821 (2001 est.)
2. this college
References in classic literature ?
You made your great name in England, you were Eton and Oxford.
It was written by Nicholas Udall, headmaster first of Eton and then of Westminster, for the boys of one or other school.
I was a boy at Eton, Sir," he said, "when my father's losses ruined him.
At Eton Slocomb there was a good coach dinner, of which the box, the four front outsides, the one inside, Nicholas, the good-tempered man, and Mr Squeers, partook; while the five little boys were put to thaw by the fire, and regaled with sandwiches.
statesman and Provost (head) of Eton School, displays the Elizabethan idealism in 'The Character of a Happy Life' and in his stanzas in praise of Elizabeth, daughter of King James, wife of the ill-starred Elector-Palatine and King of Bohemia, and ancestress of the present English royal family.
It may be imagined that a gentleman so qualified and so disposed, was in no danger of becoming formidable to the learned seminaries of Eton or Westminster.
Now, William Dobbin, from an incapacity to acquire the rudiments of the above language, as they are propounded in that wonderful book the Eton Latin Grammar, was compelled to remain among the very last of Doctor Swishtail's scholars, and was "taken down" continually by little fellows with pink faces and pinafores when he marched up with the lower form, a giant amongst them, with his downcast, stupefied look, his dog's-eared primer, and his tight corduroys.
It was a joke of a compact and portable nature, turning on the difference between Eton pears and Parliamentary pairs; but it was a joke, a refined relish of which would seem to have appeared to Lord Decimus impossible to be had without a thorough and intimate acquaintance with the tree.
Stelling set to work at his natural method of instilling the Eton Grammar and Euclid into the mind of Tom Tulliver.
Stelling took no note of these things; he only observed that Tom's faculties failed him before the abstractions hideously symbolized to him in the pages of the Eton Grammar, and that he was in a state bordering on idiocy with regard to the demonstration that two given triangles must be equal, though he could discern with great promptitude and certainty the fact that they
Stelling so many questions about the Roman Empire, and whether there really ever was a man who said, in Latin, "I would not buy it for a farthing or a rotten nut," or whether that had only been turned into Latin, that Tom had actually come to a dim understanding of the fact that there had once been people upon the earth who were so fortunate as to know Latin without learning it through the medium of the Eton Grammar.
Nobody venturing to dispute these positions, he proceeded to observe that the human hair was a great retainer of tobacco-smoke, and that the young gentlemen of Westminster and Eton, after eating vast quantities of apples to conceal any scent of cigars from their anxious friends, were usually detected in consequence of their heads possessing this remarkable property; when he concluded that if the Royal Society would turn their attention to the circumstance, and endeavour to find in the resources of science a means of preventing such untoward revelations, they might indeed be looked upon as benefactors to mankind.