Etruscan architecture


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Etruscan architecture

(700–280 B.C.)
A style which flourished in western central Italy until the Roman conquest; it is largely lost, except for underground tombs and city walls, but the characteristic true stone arch influenced later Roman construction methods. Examples that have survived show forms that were rich in ornamentation.

Etruscan architecture

Etruscan architecture: Arch of Augustus, Perugia
The architecture of the Etruscan people in western central Italy from the 8th century B.C. until their conquest by the Romans in 281 B.C. Apart from some underground tombs and city walls, it is largely lost, but remains important for the influence of its construction methods on Roman architecture, e.g., the stone arch.
References in periodicals archive ?
Boethius and Ward-Perkins (1970, 152) argue that Vitruvius and Varro were right in deriving the cava aedium (atrium) from the Etruscans because the main features of the atrium could be traced back to the archaic Etruscan architecture.
He not only dismissed the role of Greek influence on Etruscan art, he also advocated the superiority of Etruscan architecture over most other classical architecture.
Further north, Hawksmoor's masterpiece, Christ Church, Spitalfields, has an ominous, pyramidal spire above an arched portico influenced by classical Etruscan architecture.