Ettarre

Ettarre

encourages knight’s love to gain his tournament prize. [Br. Lit.: Idylls of the King, “Pelleas and Ettarre”]
References in periodicals archive ?
Following Pelleas' rejection of Ettarre, meanwhile, Ettarre's "ever-veering fancy" fixes itself perversely upon the man she once scorned and, "desiring him in vain," she, like Elaine, "waste[sj and pine[s]" away (Pelleas and Ettarre, 11.
Kaiser concludes by juxtaposing Matthew Arnold's critique of games-mad aristocrats (play as competition) and its cure in the free play of the mind with Tennyson's Idylls of the King, in which homosocial competition in jousts and tourneys leads to civic cohesion while the subversive, imaginary, self-enabling play of desiring women like Vivien or Ettarre undo it.
The last line of the preceding idyll is Modred's thought that "The time is hard at hand" (Pelleas and Ettarre, l.
As per convention, Balin and Balan, The Coming of Arthur, Guinevere, Geraint and Enid, Gareth and Lynette, The Holy Grail, Lancelot and Elaine, The Last Tournament, The Marriage of Geraint, Merlin and Vivien, The Passing of Arthur, and Pelleas and Ettarre are identified by the abbreviations BB, CA, G, GE, GL, HG, LE, LT, MG, MV, PA, PE, respectively.