Etymon


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Etymon

 

a form or meaning from which a word in a modern language is derived. For example, the Russian verb vnushat’ (“to inspire”) is derived from two etymons: the preposition V ъ n (“in”) and the noun ukho (“ear”). Etymons are identified through scientific etymological research. The establishment of etymons plays an important role in the study of problems in such areas as ethnogeny, ancient substrata, the historical development of language, and relationships between languages.

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lolu) 'dress, clothes', whose etymons are unknown to me.
In current use, the Anglicism is attested as having a double significance just like its English etymon: (1) make-up, cosmetic products, corresponding to the first meaning of the English word make-up ,,substance used especially by women to make their faces look more attractive" - DEA: 461) ,,...
On the basis of her own field data, Nicole Kruspe (personal communication) has proposed that Ceq Wong (Northern Aslian) tber "hillside" and Semaq Beri (Southern Aslian) taber "(hill)side, riverbank" might also belong in this etymon. If this connection is accepted, then it is clear that the word in question is present in three of the four main branches of Aslian, with meanings related to those I have just suggested.
"Ming [660E [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (ming/minh)]" was a newly made ethnonym from an etymon that means 'bright', and also the name of Manichaeism in China.
Appropriately, given his desire for "gloire" and his love of flashy attire, his name derives from the etymon lux or "light" (Hanks 212-13).
let us go down, and there confound their language, that they may not understand one another's speech." The narrator then adds: "Therefore is the name of it called Babel; because the Lord did there confound the language of all the earth." Babel, due to the Hebrew root BLL, meaning mix, confuse, rather than the accepted etymon babilu, or "the gate of god" in Akkadian.
Selon Slenes, ce mot provient du mot ngoma (<< presque un etymon universel de "tambour" dans toutes les langues bantoues >>) qui designe un type de grand tambour, recouvert d'un seul cote par une peau d'animal et qui s'accorde en rapprochant du feu son cote couvert (Slenes 1982 : 124).
(1) "Devenir" et "verser" ("tourner": "vertere") peuvent se concevoir comme exprimant un meme acte, un seul phenomene; "werden" ("devenir" en allemand) sort du meme etymon que le latin "vertere".
In Rosenthal's perspective, religion (as the Latin etymon, "religio" suggests) implies joining people together with an adhesive power.
(2) These two lexemes strike us as being good test items for our approach given that, (i) they both originate in the same etymon, namely the Latin demonstrative IAM (cf.
Word studies: lexicography: bilingual dictionaries, lexicography: classical Arabic, lexicography: monolingual dictionaries, lexicon: matrix and etymon model, Persian loanwords.
This knowledge is essential to track the different semantic innovations that have been created from the original meaning and from the etymon from which it arose.