Eubulus


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Eubulus

 

Born about 405 B.C.; died 330 B.C. Athenian orator and statesman.

Eubulus, a contemporary and political opponent of Demosthenes, supported the alliance between Athens and Macedonia. Elected to the post of government treasurer, in 354 B.C. he promulgated a law increasing the theoric fund, that is, entertainment money to be distributed to the citizens on days of festivals and spectacles; this law was in effect until 339 B.C. At the same time he decreased military expenditures. In 346 B.C., Eubulus supported the Peace of Philoc-rates with the Macedonian ruler Phillip II, an agreement that was extremely disadvantageous to Athens.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(15) While Chamberlain's misadventures in government remain legendary, lesser known are the policies of his Athenian doppelganger, Eubulus, who gutted Athens' stratiotic (military) fund and endorsed isolationist policies at a time when Philip was expanding his influence rapidly in neighboring states.
Eubulus, in contrast to Thrasyllus and Polemon, is a resident of the Athenian countryside who can afford a lavish lifestyle that involves drinking parties and orgies.
Lo que es innegable es que Hermias fue el tirano o dictador, despues de Eubulus, de Atarneo, el lugar de nacimiento de Proxeno, quien fue el padre adoptivo de Aristoteles o su tutor (62).
Lowin's old Counselor, Eubulus, in The Picture, portrays the voice of wisdom while addressing concern about powerful leaders who are inattentive to the "excesses of peace" (114).
For the last selection he copied from this play--the only extract not copied in its original order--Briton chose the words of one of Gorboduc's faithful advisors, Eubulus, upon hearing that the royal line has ended: '& loe the entry to the wofull wrack / & vtter Ruyne' (f 90v, 5.2.181-2).
The riddle of Lot and Eubulus's pieces may suffice to show how the sexual riddle form, which largely derives from folk culture, has usually made its way through literary riddling from antiquity.
The earliest of these, Thomas Norton and Thomas Sackville's Gorboduc, offers a virtual prophecy of Tamburlaine when Eubulus says: Lo, Britain realm is left an open prey, A present spoil by conquest to ensue.
The character Eubulus refers to "the caterpillars of all courts et fruges consumere nati"; The Works of Richard Edwards: Politics, Poetry and Performance in Sixteenth-century England, ed.
To Eubulus' question "Which community [or convent, 'collegium'] did you choose?" Catarina replies: "Chrysercium." (Eubulus:) "I'm acquainted with it -- near your home" (Agnosco, aedibus paternis vicinum).
Another local kapeleion crops up at Eubulus 80 K-A, where, it seems, a nurse nips across the road for a drink.
The formal speeches of King Gorboduc and Arostos and of Philander and Eubulus, respectively for and against the transfer of royal rule from father to sons, are mirrored in act II in the conflicting advice of Hermon and Dordan and of Tyndar and Philander to Ferrex and Porrex respectively.