Eubulus


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Eubulus

 

Born about 405 B.C.; died 330 B.C. Athenian orator and statesman.

Eubulus, a contemporary and political opponent of Demosthenes, supported the alliance between Athens and Macedonia. Elected to the post of government treasurer, in 354 B.C. he promulgated a law increasing the theoric fund, that is, entertainment money to be distributed to the citizens on days of festivals and spectacles; this law was in effect until 339 B.C. At the same time he decreased military expenditures. In 346 B.C., Eubulus supported the Peace of Philoc-rates with the Macedonian ruler Phillip II, an agreement that was extremely disadvantageous to Athens.

References in periodicals archive ?
Lowin's old Counselor, Eubulus, in The Picture, portrays the voice of wisdom while addressing concern about powerful leaders who are inattentive to the "excesses of peace" (114).
For the last selection he copied from this play--the only extract not copied in its original order--Briton chose the words of one of Gorboduc's faithful advisors, Eubulus, upon hearing that the royal line has ended: '& loe the entry to the wofull wrack / & vtter Ruyne' (f 90v, 5.
The answer that is provided implicitly alerts readers to the potential sexual solution "penis": "You can decide for yourselves that this signifies the allotment-urn, for I don't want to cite all that Eubulus says.
The earliest of these, Thomas Norton and Thomas Sackville's Gorboduc, offers a virtual prophecy of Tamburlaine when Eubulus says:
The character Eubulus refers to "the caterpillars of all courts et fruges consumere nati"; The Works of Richard Edwards: Politics, Poetry and Performance in Sixteenth-century England, ed.
Another local kapeleion crops up at Eubulus 80 K-A, where, it seems, a nurse nips across the road for a drink.
The formal speeches of King Gorboduc and Arostos and of Philander and Eubulus, respectively for and against the transfer of royal rule from father to sons, are mirrored in act II in the conflicting advice of Hermon and Dordan and of Tyndar and Philander to Ferrex and Porrex respectively.
Likewise he defers to the remark of Eubulus against Chares `in the lawcourts' (1376a9-l2), and to Callistratus' behaviour `in the Messenian assembly' (1418b9-l2).
Hunter, Eubulus, the Fragments (Cambridge, 1983), pp.
The third, Eubulus, the king's secretary, whose name means 'wise counsellor', opposes the plan.